Displaying Module Resources

A Cinderella Comparison
A Cinderella Comparison

Students will compare various cultures and gain an understanding of what is important in different cultures, through analyzing various versions of the fairy tale Cinderella.

Plastics…to Use or Not to Use?
Plastics…to Use or Not to Use?

Students will construct an argumentation piece that defends their position on the widely debated topic of the use of plastic water bottles and storage containers for drinks and foods. The unit of study, within which this module happens to fall, is chemical bonding. Students have been discussing three types of chemical bonding: ionic, covalent, and metallic, and how this type of bonding affects the structure of matter. Students will construct a piece defending their position, as well as using their knowledge of chemical bonding and compounds to explain either the benefits or the harmful effects of using plastics to contain our everyday foods and drinks.

The Effect Algal Blooms Have on Marine Ecosystems
The Effect Algal Blooms Have on Marine Ecosystems

Population balance in marine ecosystems is crucial to sustaining a healthy system. The results of human activities, such as fertilizer run-off from nearby farmlands into the Mississippi River, can impact energy webs by offsetting predator-prey relationships. Seventh grade life science students are required to use scientific articles to research the cause and effect of algal blooms off the coast of the U.S. and write a letter to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to inform the agency of the problem as well as suggest possible solutions. This informational module poses the project scenario to students by using Template Task 25.

Letter to Congress
Letter to Congress

In this English and U.S. history module, 11th grade students research fundamental elements of the Constitution, landmark Supreme Court cases, and a modern congressional issue. Using Template Task 1, students participate in the democratic process by writing letters to a member of Congress arguing their positions on a constitutional issue of their choosing.

Biodiversity
Biodiversity

Earth is rich with an amazing variety of life. Is it important to preserve this biodiversity? This introductory writing assignment for a life science class focuses on introducing 7th grade students to the concept and importance of biodiversity. After reading articles on biodiversity, students write a report that defines “biodiversity” and explain its importance by following Template Task 11.

Julius Caesar: Hero or tyrant?
Julius Caesar: Hero or tyrant?

The Roman Empire was the largest and most enduring empire in the ancient world. The Romans had highly organized political, social, religious, technological, and economic systems that enabled them to control the territories and people within their borders. This 7th grade world history unit is embedded in the study of empires and the management systems they used. Students use both primary and secondary resources in their research on Julius Caesar. Using Template Task 2, students will investigate Caesar as an emblem of the Roman Empire's strengths and weaknesses and argue whether he should be considered a hero or a tyrant.

Diseases in Livestock
Diseases in Livestock

Based on a real-world scenario, this module asks high school students in a career and technical education class to create an informational pamphlet for farmers and ranchers on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of livestock diseases, including bovine trichomoniasis.

The Individual and the Community: My Responsibilities in a Time of Crisis
The Individual and the Community: My Responsibilities in a Time of Crisis

This is a middle school social studies module that addresses the relationship between the individual and society (one and many): specifically, what are the individual’s responsibilities with regard to the “social good”? This module is built around the Paideia method and the Socratic seminar.

The Laws of Conservation and Photosynthesis
The Laws of Conservation and Photosynthesis

The laws of conservation of matter and conservation of energy are demonstrable through an examination of the photosynthetic process. This informational module affords 8th grade physical science students the opportunity to examine the relationship between matter and energy as evidenced by transformations that take place during photosynthesis. The student work will lead to a deeper understanding of the laws of conservation drawn from students' previous knowledge of a biological process. After researching texts on photosynthesis, the law of conservation of matter, and the law of conservation of energy, students will answer Template Task 13 by writing an informational essay that describes how the photosynthetic process can be used to demonstrate both the law of conservation of matter and the law of conservation of energy.

Should helmets be required?
Should helmets be required?

Some states do not require children over a certain age to wear helmets or protective gear while riding a bike. However, there is a potential risk of injury for riders. In this science module, 6th grade students read texts on Newton's Laws of Motion, bodily injury, and current state laws on helmet requirements. Using Template Task 2, students write a letter arguing whether or not helmets should be required for adolescents during recreational activities.

What Are the Causes and Effects of Noise Pollution?
What Are the Causes and Effects of Noise Pollution?

This 8th grade physical science module is structured around students’ background knowledge of the characteristics of mechanical longitudinal waves, including amplitude (decibels), frequency (hertz), compressions, rarefactions, pitch, loudness, wavelength, and speed. Here, students apply their knowledge to noise pollution and the effects it has on marine animals. They read articles about noise pollution and, using Task Template 24, construct an essay to determine if government regulations are needed to deter future noise pollution.

Romeo and Juliet: Decisions
Romeo and Juliet: Decisions

After reading Romeo and Juliet and researching articles on how the adolescent brain functions, 9th grade students examine the criteria for making a good decision using a business decision-making model. Students then examine the choices the characters Romeo and Juliet made and follow Template Task 2 to write an advice article for a teen publication that addresses the question: what is the process for making a good decision?

Extended Metaphors in Walt Whitman’s “O Captain! My Captain!”
Extended Metaphors in Walt Whitman’s “O Captain! My Captain!”

“O Captain! My Captain!” is one of Walt Whitman’s most famous poems. Whitman not only expresses his own grief over the loss of Abraham Lincoln, but also represents the somber feelings of many Americans during a time when they otherwise would have been celebrating the Union’s Civil War victory. Whitman uses a number of extended metaphors – most notably comparing Lincoln to the captain of a ship – to speak for the nation. Using Template Task 2, 8th grade students determine if Whitman was justified in his comparisons.

Career Exploration Wrap Up: Informational
Career Exploration Wrap Up: Informational

Career and technical education students in 6th, 7th, and 8th grades use an interactive online career assessment tool to narrow down potential career possibilities. Students write an informational essay that describes their desired career and the education needed to find a position in that field. Students answer Template Task 13 by supporting their response with evidence from their research.

Nuclear Sustainability
Nuclear Sustainability

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* In this Project Based Learning (PBL) unit, 11th grade chemistry students are asked to answer the question, “Is nuclear energy sustainable?” by responding to Template Task 2. First, students are introduced to their task through an entry event in which they are given a brief introduction to the nuclear energy controversy and are told they will be writing an op-ed piece arguing for or against nuclear power based on their knowledge of the atom, nuclear chemistry, and nuclear power. They are also tasked with creating a public service announcement to persuade others of their views. After identifying what they know and want to learn about nuclear chemistry and nuclear power, they research the topics, complete labs and activities about atomic structure, read a number of different opinion pieces, and hear a presentation from an activist. They work collaboratively in groups for much of the process. Then they write their op-ed individually and complete the public service announcement in groups. The project concludes with presentations of their editorials and public service announcements to the class and community activists.

Existentialism and Kafka
Existentialism and Kafka

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* In this English literacy module, sophomore students conduct research on the existentialist movement in literature. Students read Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis and determine if Kafka’s work reflects existential ideas. After researching essays and articles on existentialism, students write an essay answering Template Task 11 that defines existentialism and explains its impact on Kafka’s work.

Good Readers and Good Writers
Good Readers and Good Writers

Targeted for 10th grade English Language Arts students, this unit uses texts at different levels of difficulty to reach readers of varying ability levels. Students examine four texts to determine what qualities one must have to be considered a "good reader" and a "good writer." This module uses Template Task 2."

Great Expectations: Growing into a Hero: Informational Module
Great Expectations: Growing into a Hero: Informational Module

The monomyth, or the hero's journey, is a narrative theme examined in detail in The Hero with a Thousand Faces (2008) by Joseph Campbell. Based on the concept of archetypes, the hero's journey can be identified in quest stories, both emotional and physical, from a variety of time periods and cultures. After conducting research on the hero's journey, advanced 7th grade English Language Arts students will write an informational essay framed by Template Task 11 that defines the word "archetype" and explains how the hero's journey is evident in Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.

Comparing Economic Systems
Comparing Economic Systems

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* Every society operates with a mixed economic system, combining the influences of market and command models in order to form a functioning economy and government. Individual countries have unique combinations of the market and command influences depending on how countries prioritize different economic goals. Students will learn the characteristics of the market and command systems and evaluate the benefits and consequences of each system.

The Power of Language (Communication is More than Language)
The Power of Language (Communication is More than Language)

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* This language arts module addresses the effects of language structures in nonfiction and poetry. This module involves critical analysis of genre structure, grammar, and literary devices. NOTE: This module is designed to teach and assess the Common Core State Standards College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening, including a formal and rigorous dialogue about concepts and ideas, as well as Common Core Reading and Writing standards.

Energy Transfer
Energy Transfer

All parts of matter have kinetic energy. The kinetic energy of the particles can change speed, resulting in phase change. The three states of matter on Earth are solid, liquid, and gas. During this module, 8th grade science students read texts on states of matter, kinetic energy, and particles and write an informational essay using Template Task 11 that explains the motion of the particles through the states of matter.

Ancient India and China
Ancient India and China

Ancient India and China both developed along river valleys and became flourishing civilizations. This module will explore the geography, culture/customs, and the government of these two civilizations. Students will then draw conclusions or make implications in regard to the development and longevity of one of the cultures and how it developed with its own unique government and culture/customs. Students will be assigned one culture for research, and through shared presentations, students will be exposed to both cultures.

Language Is Power
Language Is Power

This argumentation module for a high school English class is designed to follow a class reading of Animal Farm and asks students to examine the propaganda and fallacies present in the novel’s events and dialogue. Students analyze the novel using Template Task 2.

The Cold War
The Cold War

Students will read primary sources to help gain understanding of the Cold War from 1945 to 1975. Major themes explored in the unit include political decisions and actions of the U.S. and foreign governments, military strategies, and reactions of American Society. Students will use the knowledge of the time period and evidence from primary source documents to write a rough draft of an argumentation essay in response to the teaching task. Students will complete the teaching task in preparation for a final classroom assessment task. Students will learn most of the content first and complete the literacy module at the end of the unit.

The Great War: Evaluating the Treaty of Versailles
The Great War: Evaluating the Treaty of Versailles

Students study a variety of primary sources, maps, and supporting documents concerning the post-war peace process, developing a context for evaluating whether the treaty was viable and fair. Students also consider complex questions surrounding historical causality and responsibility. This argumentation module is written around Template Task 2 for a high school social studies class.

Pandemic: Catch the Fever
Pandemic: Catch the Fever

Which is more important: scientific freedom or the public's right to safety? Tenth grade students in a health class read three articles on the 1918 influenza pandemic genome and address the aforementioned question. The articles discuss the successful scientific research on reconstruction of the genome and the scientific community's decision to publish the complete genome. Using Template Task 8, students write an editorial that identifies a problem with publishing this research and argues in favor of or against controlling the publication of certain types of scientific research.

Ideologies of the 19th Century
Ideologies of the 19th Century

As 9th grade students engage in this history module, they apply what they previously learned in a unit on political ideologies in Europe in the 19th century to answer Template Task 2. The module reinforces students’ ability to develop a historical essay through the research and writing processes.

Stranger in the Village: Informational
Stranger in the Village: Informational

This 12th grade English Language Arts module uses Template Task 21, along with text, film, and photography resources, to address the theme "stranger in the village." Texts aligned with this theme include characters or subjects that are isolated or different from others in their respective societies. Students will analyze how writers and artists organize or construct text to convey meaning and to relay this specific message.

Government of the People
Government of the People

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* This argumentation module asks 9th and 10th grade students in a humanities class to read two famous speeches regarding the rights and responsibilities of citizens in a democracy. Students are challenged to closely analyze these speeches in terms of language structure and democratic ideals by answering Template Task 4. The instructional sequence in this module includes independent and supported reading, conceptual dialogue, writing a comparative analysis essay, and Paideia Seminar discussion. Ultimately, students practice a series of interrelated literacy skills while gaining a deeper understanding of the historical rhetoric of two iconic leaders. The classroom assessment builds on the comparative analysis writing practice and challenges students to expand their thinking about rhetoric in contemporary American democracy.

You Can Run, but You Can
You Can Run, but You Can't Hide!

Ninth grade advanced reading students are asked to explore the influence that digital technology has on their everyday lives. Using Template Task 8, students write an editorial that identifies a problem caused by others using the digital footprints we either purposely or inadvertently create. Students examine the intersection of social media and virtual and real life vulnerability. Students will take a close look at the implications of identity theft, unsolicited background checks, social media, and other ways we potentially expose ourselves through the use of technology.

Recognizing Human Rights Violations in Countries in Crisis
Recognizing Human Rights Violations in Countries in Crisis

Students learn to recognize and analyze human rights violations in historical or current texts by using primary and secondary sources. Using Template Task 20, 10th grade English Language Arts students apply the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to analyze human rights violations in a specific country.

Why Canadians Live Where They Live: The Impact of Geography on Population Density in Canada.
Why Canadians Live Where They Live: The Impact of Geography on Population Density in Canada.

Sixth grade social studies students learning about world cultures and geography explore the impact of geographic characteristics on the population density of a post-industrialized nation (Canada). Students are asked to determine which factor — climate, location, or the distribution of natural resources — has the biggest impact on population density by addressing Template Task 6.

Alexander the Great: Was He or Wasn’t He a Great Military Leader?
Alexander the Great: Was He or Wasn’t He a Great Military Leader?

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* Throughout history, military leaders have led conquests in an effort to increase their own or their country’s power. Some of the most exceptional of these leaders have been assigned the label “great” and continue to be featured in lessons on both history and military strategy. Students read a variety of informational and persuasive texts to analyze Alexander the Great’s success in battle and the influence that his success had on countless military commanders who followed, arguing the degree of greatness of this young Macedonian king by answering Template Task 2.

Cryobiology
Cryobiology

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* This module is nested within a larger unit on states and properties of matter in a physical science class. Eighth grade students expound upon these topics by examining the field of cryobiology, which is the study of living things at very low temperatures. Students will examine the pros and cons of the techniques used, as this science relies on a number of controversial and cutting edge technologies, and formulate an argument based on scientific facts using Template Task 2.

Using Classification to Investigate Living Organisms
Using Classification to Investigate Living Organisms

Students will be able to investigate the diversity of living organisms and how they can be compared scientifically. They will recognize the organisms' characteristics and classify them into specific domains and kingdoms based upon the physical characteristics they observe.

The British Industrial Revolution
The British Industrial Revolution

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* By addressing Template Task 2, 10th grade social studies students answer the question: Were the achievements and growth experienced during the Industrial Revolution era worth the cost to society? This module sits inside a global history unit in which students study the Age of Revolution, focusing on the British Industrial Revolution.

Courage in Part One: To Kill A Mockingbird
Courage in Part One: To Kill A Mockingbird

Targeted for 9th and 10th graders, this literacy informational module uses Template Task 12 to focus on the definition of “courage” in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Many characters in the story display courage and as the novel progresses, these acts of courage increase in significance and scope. As they read, students generate a definition of “courage” as seen through the eyes of Harper Lee. Students also draw conclusions about Harper Lee's views on courage based upon the novel’s characters and events.

A Reading of the Gettysburg Address
A Reading of the Gettysburg Address

In this argumentation module, 9th and 10th grade students perform a close reading of the Gettysburg Address, participate in a Paideia Seminar on the text, and write an essay in which they evaluate Lincoln’s definition of democracy based on the speech using Template Task 6. This unit merges American history content with Common Core literacy skills.

Interpreting Distance-Time Graphs
Interpreting Distance-Time Graphs

Students connect descriptions of everyday situations with distance-time tables and graphs and relate speeds to the slopes of the graphs.

Solving Linear Equations in Two Variables
Solving Linear Equations in Two Variables

Students solve a problem using two linear equations with two variables and interpret the meaning of algebraic expressions.

Akiak
Akiak

Akiak by Robert J. Blake is the story of a sled dog who, despite being injured and disqualified from the Iditarod, perseveres to follow her owner and team of dogs to the finish line. This 4th grade unit centers on the big idea that courage is sometimes necessary to win and that “winning” can mean different things, depending on the situation.

Defining Regions Using Inequalities
Defining Regions Using Inequalities

Students combine linear inequalities, correctly representing them on a graph, to identify a set of solutions.

Ramona Quimby, Age 8
Ramona Quimby, Age 8

Third grade students analyze the story Ramona Quimby, Age 8 by Beverly Clearly using text-dependent questions, academic vocabulary, and a culminating task that asks them to re-read, think, discuss, and write with the goal of understanding that all families disagree and argue at times, even nice ones.

The Smallest Dragonboy
The Smallest Dragonboy

This unit is based on the fantasy story The Smallest Dragonboy by Anne McCaffery. Students fill in a conflicts chart, or tree map, to help them track internal and external conflicts within the story. They then use the chart, along with their responses to text-dependent questions and evidence from the story, to write an essay that answers the question: How does the main character’s determination and perseverance help him overcome challenges?

Evaluating Statements about Probability
Evaluating Statements about Probability

Students critique statements illustrating common misconceptions about the probability of simple and compound events.

Modeling Situations With Linear Equations
Modeling Situations With Linear Equations

Students explore relationships between variables in everyday situations using graphs, tables, and formulae.

Calculating Volumes of Compound Objects
Calculating Volumes of Compound Objects

This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students are able to solve problems involving measurement.

Justin and the Best Biscuits in the World
Justin and the Best Biscuits in the World

Use the story Justin and the Best Biscuits in the World by Mildred Pitts Walker to help 4th grade students understand how to resolve conflicts. This unit focuses on difficult emotions, such as inadequacy and embarrassment, as well as dispels traditional gender roles. Help students to understand these big ideas by asking text-dependent questions, leading the class in discussion, and explaining complex academic vocabulary.

Estimations and Approximations: The Money Munchers
Estimations and Approximations: The Money Munchers

Students make sensible assumptions and estimates in order to model a situation and solve a practical problem.

Evaluating Statements About Enlargements (2D and 3D)
Evaluating Statements About Enlargements (2D and 3D)

Students compute perimeter, area, and volume using formulas and find relationships in perimeter, area, and volume after scaling.

Interpreting Statistics: A Case of Muddying the Waters
Interpreting Statistics: A Case of Muddying the Waters

Students take on roles in an inquiry into a pollution problem and explore the application, interpretation, communication, and possible misrepresentation of statistics and charts.

Evaluating Statements about Length and Area
Evaluating Statements about Length and Area

Students critique conjectures about length and area and construct examples and counter-examples to refute or justify them.

Interpreting Algebraic Expressions
Interpreting Algebraic Expressions

Students make connections between expressions represented as words, tables, diagrams, and algebra, recognizing order of operations, the distributive law, and equivalent expressions.

Forming Quadratics
Forming Quadratics

Students use algebra and graphs to explore how the standard, factored, and completed square forms of a quadratic relate to the intercept, roots, maxima, and minima of function.

Optimization Problems: Boomerangs
Optimization Problems: Boomerangs

Students solve a problem of optimizing within constraints and then explore alternative algebraic and graphical approaches involving systems of linear equations.

Sorting Equations and Identities
Sorting Equations and Identities

Students sort algebraic statements into identities, equations with solutions, and equations with no solutions, using manipulation and substitution to justify their choices.

Finding Equations of Parallel and Perpendicular Lines
Finding Equations of Parallel and Perpendicular Lines

Students identify parallel and perpendicular lines and find points of intersection and x- and y-intercepts by looking at the equations of the lines.

Sees Behind Trees
Sees Behind Trees

Sees Behind Trees by Michael Dorris is the story of a boy who overcomes a physical deficit and finds his own unique strengths in the process. After failing at a ritual required by his tribe for passage into manhood, the main character is frustrated and embarrassed. But with his mother’s help, he discovers a way to work around his physical challenge. In this 5th grade unit, students trace the story’s symbolic use of moss, which is directly related to the main character’s goal, as well as the sash that plays a key role in uncovering his talents. Students will examine and discuss the story’s plot and characters, supporting their observations with evidence from the text.

Sleds on Boston Common
Sleds on Boston Common

In Louise Borden’s Sleds on Boston Common, a fictional story based on local Boston lore, the narrator is 9-year-old Henry Price. Seeking to change how things are run after British soldiers take over the city in 1774, he speaks to the general in charge of the troops about allowing the local children to sled on the Common. Will Henry get a place to sled? Use this unit to help 5th grade students understand that by speaking up and clearly explaining their reasoning, it is possible to create positive change.

Increasing and Decreasing Quantities by a Percent
Increasing and Decreasing Quantities by a Percent

Students explore multiple representations of percent increase and decrease using words, multiplication by decimals, and multiplication by fractions.

Prudy
Prudy's Problem and How She Solved It

Help students understand the importance of creativity in problem solving using this 3rd grade unit on the book Prudy’s Problem and How She Solved It by Carey Armstrong-Ellis. You will find text-dependent questions and sample answers within this unit, as well as academic vocabulary essential to understanding.

Geometry Problems: Circles and Triangles
Geometry Problems: Circles and Triangles

Students use the properties of circles and triangles to find the relative areas of shapes in a pattern and explore alternative approaches to tackling the problem.

Applying Angle Theorems
Applying Angle Theorems

Students solve problems using the measures of the interior and exterior angles of polygons, specifically pentagons.

Generalizing Patterns: Table Tiles
Generalizing Patterns: Table Tiles

Students solve the problem of how many different tiles are needed to create a pattern at various sizes and explore alternative algebraic and geometrical approaches using linear and quadratic relationships.

Sarah Cynthia Stout Would Not Take the Garbage Out
Sarah Cynthia Stout Would Not Take the Garbage Out

This short unit is based on the poem “Sarah Cynthia Stout Would Not Take the Garbage Out” by Shel Silverstein. Known for writing hilarious poems full of figurative language and exaggeration, Silverstein illustrates how one seemingly small choice can have colossal consequences.

Representing and Combining Transformations
Representing and Combining Transformations

Students reflect and rotate two-dimensional shapes, describe transformations, and explore the effects of combining transformations.

EduCore Log-in