Discipline: ELA

Grade Level: 12

Course: English 4: Florida College Prep

©Literacy Design Collaborative. September 2011

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Stranger in the Village: Informational
What
Instruction?
  • Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task

      Lesson 1

      1 Day

      1. Pretest

      Ability to connect the task and content to existing skills

      Baseline Explanatory/Analysis Essay

      How do writers and artists organize or construct text to convey meaning? After reading "Four Skinny Trees" and analyzing the photo "Integration of Central High School," write an essay that addresses the question and analyzes the "stranger in the village" theme, providing examples to clarify your analysis. What conclusions or implications can you draw?

      Product meets expectations: 

      Student is able to define and analyze the theme "stranger in the village," define how the author and artist conveys the theme, cite textual evidence to support his or her claim, and follow conventions of Standard Written English.


      Not Yet:

      Student is unable to define the theme, provide supporting textual evidence, explain how the author and/or artist has conveyed the theme, or does not follow the conventions of Standard Written English.

      • Students will be given "Four Skinny Trees" by Sandra Cisneros and a visual piece,. then respond to the teaching task. 

      Lesson 2

      2 Days

      2. Bridging Conversation

      Ability to connect the task and new content to existing knowledge, skills, and experiences

      Visual representation 

      Create a visual representation that demonstrates how the author uses symbolism, imagery, and diction to relay the theme in the "Four Skinny Trees" vignette.

      Product meets expectations: 

      Student is able to visually represent the four trees as symbols of isolation and strength and address how the author uses symbolism, imagery, and diction to relay the theme.


      Not yet: Student is unable to identify what the trees represent or does not address how the author uses symbolism, imagery, or diction to relay the theme.

      • Quick-write
      • Text-marking of symbolism, theme, speaker's self-perception, and imager
      • Teacher modeling
      • Chunking text
      • Visualization

      Lesson 3

      1 Day

      3. Task Analysis

      Ability to understand and explain the task prompt and rubric and understand the roles of the reader and writer when engaged in responding critically to a text

      Knowledge and Skill Chart

      Identify what you need to know and be able to do in order to complete the teaching task.

      Internalize the rubric in order to understand how your writing will be scored.

      No Scoring

      • Think-Pair-Share
      • Close reading of the prompt and text marking of knowledge and skills needed to complete the teaching task
      • Small group summarization
      • Class Web of knowledge and skills
  • Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process

      Lesson 4

      1 Day

      Preparing for Reading

      Ability to prepare for reading by selecting and applying a note-taking format

      Note-taking device 

      Select a note-taking device that you will use to record textual evidence throughout the module.


      Reflective Response

      Write a brief reflection identifying your choice of note-taking format. Explain why it is beneficial to your learning style.

      Product meets expectations: Student is able to select a note-taking format that he/she will be able to use throughout the module.

      Not yet: Student is unable to make an appropriate selection of a note-taking format.


      No Scoring

      • Review basic note -taking formats and discuss the benefits and/or differences among the formats.

      Lesson 5

      2 Days

      2. Essential Vocabulary

      Ability to apply strategies to acquire and use academic and domain-specific vocabulary

      Notes and graphic organizer

      Identify and explain content vocabulary and literary, cinematic, and artistic elements relating to the "stranger in a village" theme.

      Product meets expectations: Student is able to cite examples of elements/vocabularyusing selected text and visual art.

      Not yet: Student is unable to identify or explain with examples  of the vocabulary.

      • Word Wall
      • Student self-selected vocabulary device(word study graphic organizer)
      • QHT vocabulary strategy: Q: Words I have questions about. H: Words I have heard of. T: Words I know well enough to teach

      Lesson 6

      6 Days

      3. Active Reading and Note- taking 1

      Ability to read purposefully, and to select and record textual evidence 

      Quick Write 

      After viewing segments of the film and reviewing cinematic devices, what has helped you understand the director's message?


      Co-constructed Summary Paragraph

      Prepare a cooperatively constructed summary, beginning with the topic sentence: In the opening scenes of Finding Forrester, Gus Van Sant employs a number of cinematic devices to define the expounding boundaries of Jamal Wallace's world. 


      Analytical Paragraph

      How does Van Sant construct meaning in Finding Forrester? Write an analytical paragraph in which you answer the question, support with textual evidence, and provide commentary.


      Character Analysis

      Consider how Jamal's travels as both a stranger and a member of several villages have helped him find his true self. 

      Write a one-page essay in which you analyze how Van Sant has developed Jamal's character and made meaning of the text. 

      Product meets expectations: Student is
      able to complete the Quick-write, making references to the film and the director's use of cinematic devices.  

      Not yet: Student is unable to explain the director's use of cinematic devices to create meaning in film.


      Product meets expectations: Student is able to work cooperatively with group and supply at least two sentences to the paragraph. 

      Not yet: Student is unable to work cooperatively with group or unable to supply at least one example of his/her cinematic device and one commentary sentence.


      Product meets expectations: Student is able to analyze the film for the use of cinematic devices in creating meaning, give examples from the film, and comment upon the theme, "stranger in the village."

      Not yet: Student is unable to identify how the director utilizes cinematic devices to convey the theme, "stranger in the village," and/or does not give support or commentary.


      Product meets expectations: Student is able to write an analysis of Jamal and explain how the director has developed his character.

      Not yet: Student is unable to describe "a stranger in the village" or explain how the director developed the character.

      • Critically view the film to see what the director does to set the stranger apart from the village
      • Note-taking 
      • Expert Groups
      • Gradual release, including modeling and think-alouds, guided instruction, and independent practice.
      • Cooperative Groups
      • 3-Column Note graphic organizer
      • All-Write Round Robin

      Lesson 7

      2 Days

      4. Active Reading

      Ability to orchestrate the skills, strategies and behaviors needed to read and make meaning of the text

      Quick-Write

      Complete a quick-write in which you compare how Edmond Montez and Luis Rodriguez convey theme through the use of diction, imagery, and detail. Discuss the poets' effectiveness in using those elements. 

      Product meets expectations: Student is able to use examples from the texts to analyze how the poets' use of imagery, sensory details and diction develops theme.

      Not yet: Student is unable to make a comparison between the two poems, is unable to identify examples for support, or is unable explain how the poets used the elements to construct or convey theme.

      • Imagery Evidence Graphic organizer 
      • Review imagery, sensory details and diction 

      Lesson 8

      2 days

      5. Active Reading and Note-Taking 2

      Ability to read purposefully, paraphrase textual evidence, and/or record direct quotes to avoid plagiarism

      Written Explanation

      losely read and text mark the narrative "Lindo Jong: Double Face" for examples of how the writer strategically uses dialogue to enhance the presentation of ideas, the theme, and the conflict between the two characters. 

      Product meets expectations: Student is able to describe the functions of dialogue in the excerpt citing several appropriate examples.

      Not yet: Student is unable to explain how the author utilizes dialogue to reveal theme or conflict. 

      • Close reading
      • Text marking
      • Rules of punctuation to construct meaning from dialogue in text

      Lesson 9

      5 Days

      6. Active reading

      Ability to orchestrate the skills, strategies, and behaviors needed to read and make meaning of the text

      Socratic Seminar

      Participate in a Socratic Seminar that focuses on how the author's style and craft contribute to the development of the theme. 

      Product meets expectations: Student is able to discuss how the author's style and craft contribute to the effectiveness of the theme, specifically the positive and negative effect of the word choice, repetition, and sentence structure.

      Not yet: Student is unable to identify examples of the author's style or craft, is unable to identify appropriate examples that support theme, or is unable or does not participate fully in the Socratic Seminar. 

      • Chunking
      • Close reading
      • Text marking
      • Use of footnotes
      • Literary elements of: diction, repetition, syntax, imagery ,and tone
      • Jigsaw
      • Socratic Seminar
  • Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing

      Lesson 10

      1 Day

      1. Preparing for Writing

      Ability to understand analysis as a mode of discourse in explanatory writing

      2-Column Note Graphic Organizer

      Was Baldwin's conclusion positive or negative? Use the graphic organizer to organize your notes from "Stranger in the Village" and the Socratic Seminar to help answer this question.


      Round-Robin Discussion

      Using a round-robin discussion, discuss the four questions and be prepared to share with the class.

      No Scoring

      • Two-column notes
      • Round-robin Discussion
  • Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process

      Lesson 11

      1 Day

      1. Project Planning

      Ability to plan a project so the writing process is accomplished on time

      Calendar

      Create a calendar to chart your progress and monitor your time as you complete your writing.

      No Scoring

      • Self-check of parts of the essay
      • Time management

      Lesson 12

      1 Day

      2. Preparing as a Writer

      Ability to write a claim with text-based supporting detail

      Thesis Statement

      Write a thesis statement that analyzes how authors/artists convey "the stranger in the village" theme.

      Product meets expectations: Student is able to develop a claim stating his/her opinion about how the authors/artists relay the theme in their texts/visuals.


      Not yet: Student is unable to state his/her opinion or make a statement about how the authors/artists relay the theme in their texts/visuals.

      • Peer Response 
      • Writing Workshop

      Lesson 13

      2 Days

      3. Planning

      Ability to develop a line of thought to insert and cite textual evidence appropriate and relevant for  explanatory-analysis writing

      Outline

      Create a plan for a three-part, multi-paragraph essay that supports the claim with evidence from the text.

      Product meets expectation: Student is able to create a planning sheet/outline which includes three parts (introduction, body, and conclusion). The plan includes a thesis statement, topic sentences, and appropriate textual support.


      Not yet: Student is unable to create an effective outline that helps in writing the essay or the plan is missing elements, such as thesis statement, topic sentences, or textual support.

      • Writing Plan Template
      • Student Writing Plan Checklist

      Lesson 14

      2 ½ days

      4. Development 1

      Ability to construct an initial draft of the body paragraphs; each including a topic sentence, supporting text based facts, examples, and details relevant to completing the task

      Initial Draft of Body Paragraphs

      Write the initial draft of the body paragraphs; all of which include a topic sentence and textual evidence supporting the claim.

      Product meets expectations: Student is able to write body paragraphs, each containing a topic sentence and textual evidence that supports the claim.


      Not yet: Student is unable to write multiple paragraphs, or the paragraphs don't contain topic sentences, or textual evidence to support the claim.

      • Outline
      • Peer Response

      Lesson 15

      2 Days

      5. Development 2

      Ability to construct an initial draft of an opening paragraph that includes a thesis statement presenting the claim and a concluding paragraph with three parts (literal statement, figurative statement and universal statement)

      Opening and Concluding Paragraph

      Construct an opening paragraph that states the main purpose and/or question for the task.

      Write a concluding paragraph with three parts (literal, interpretive and universal statements). 

      Product meets expectations: Student is able to write an opening paragraph which contains a thesis statement stating the main purpose and/or question for the task.

      Student is able to write a concluding paragraph that has three parts (literal, interpretive and universal).


      Not yet: Student is unable to write an opening paragraph with a thesis statement, clearly stating the claim or a closing paragraph containing literal, figurative, and universal statements. 

      • Outline
      • Peer Response

      Lesson 16

      2 Days

      6. Revision

      Ability to apply revision strategies to refine the claim, monitor line of thought, ensure relevant citations, and check language and tone as appropriate to the audience and purpose

      Revised Essay 

      Discuss your essay with a partner to obtain feedback. Use the feedback to revise your essays paying particular attention to a clear thesis, a logical line of thought, language and tone, and a clear purpose.

      No scoring

      • Peer Response

      Lesson 17

      1 day

      7. Editing

      Ability to proofread writing for a variety of grammatical and mechanical errors as well as for appropriate use of MLA style

      Edited Draft

      Use proofreading marks to edit your draft for GUMS (grammar, usage, mechanics, and spelling), Modern Language Association (MLA) style, and other errors. Use the edited draft to prepare a final copy for publication.

      No scoring

      • Proofreading marks
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