Discipline: Science

Grade Level: 6th

Course: Science

©Literacy Design Collaborative. September 2011

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Should helmets be required?
What
Instruction?
  • Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task

      1 Day

      Bridging conversation:

      Ability to connect the task and new content to existing knowledge, skills, experiences, interests, and concerns.

      Short response

      In a quick write, write your first reaction (state "Yes" or "No" and why) to the Essential Question: Should adolescents be required to wear helmets during recreational activities such as bike riding and skateboarding?

      No scoring

      • Content has already been taught, but teacher will review Newton's Laws of Motion. 
      • Differentiation: Students complete task verbally with a partner. 

      1 Day

      2. Task analysis:

      Ability to understand and explain the task's prompt and rubric. 

      Class Participation

      As a class, discuss the critical features of the task. Identify the audience (State Senator) and define "adolescent," "required," and "recreational activities."

      No scoring

      • Monitor class participation to ensure each student understands the task. Ensure relevant reading material is selected or provided.
      • Visit a senator's website to build background knowledge of audience (http://senatorfolmer.com).

      Teacher Planned

      3. Project planning:

      Ability to plan so that the task is accomplished on time.

      N/A

      Teacher creates a "doable" timeline that paces reading and writing processes

      N/A

      • Instructional strategies
        Teacher uses Writer's Notebook and visual checks to help students stay on pace with project timeline.
  • Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process

      1 Day

      Active Reading 1:

      Ability to understand necessary reading strategies needed for the task.

      Student annotated text

      With teacher support, use active reading strategies to develop an understanding of the text.

      Meets:

      Annotated or "actively read" documents have a variety of marks (circles, underlining, stars, highlights, etc.)

      Show evidence of referencing the "Active Reading" handout.


      Not Yet:

      Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets."

      • Instruction for the first article (Article 1: Concussions) should be very explicit, including teacher modeling.
      • Teacher uses shared reading to model active reading techniques on interactive white board.
      • Teacher verbalizes thought process.
      • Students and teacher share ownership for identifying key ideas and important information.
      • Create and reference "Active Reading" handout throughout reading.

      5 Days

      Active reading II:

      Ability to understand necessary reading strategies needed for the task.

      completed source cards

      Use active reading strategies to understand text with appropriate supports.

      Meets:

      Demonstrated active reading and completed source cards for each article.


      Not Yet:

      Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets."

      • Teacher selects texts and distributes them to students in numerical order (Article 2: Head and Spine Trauma, Article 3: PA Bicycle Helmet Law, Article 4: Head Injuries).
      • Students read text using a variety of active reading techniques with appropriate support (paired reading, independent reading, and group instruction).
      • Teacher uses group discussion to extend thinking. For example, Article 2 Key Question "Who Pays $3.24 billion annually?"
      • Teacher reinforces active reading techniques throughout student readings.

      During 5 reading days

      3. Essential vocabulary:

      Ability to apply strategies for developing an understanding of a text by locating words and phrases that identify key concepts and facts, or information. 

      Student-annotated articles

      In your articles, identify key words or phrases as you read and define them in context of the passage in the work you are reading.

      Meets:

      Identifies vocabulary, phrases and notes their meaning and, if applicable, their meaning in context of the passages.


      Not Yet:

      Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets."

      • Use of dictionary and other sources (unit notebook) to acquire understanding.
      • Teach strategies for understanding words in context.
      • Introduce language of reading and writing relevant to task (letter).
      • Review relevant terms used in the task (adolescent, required, recreational activities, state representative).

      2-3 Days

      4. Note-taking:

      Ability to read purposefully and select relevant information; to summarize and/or paraphrase. 

      six notecards

      Write three  reasons and supporting details to support your claim in the following format: 

      On three notecards (same color) write a reason to support your claim (one per card) and identify at least three  examples/details/statistics/quotes from text to support each reason. Number each reason.

      On three notecards (same color, but different color than first three cards) number cards to match reasons and identify/explain the Law of Motion that is involved with each of your reasons.

      Meets:

      Accomplishes task by selecting relevant source material to support controlling idea (include L2 and 3 if applied to task).

      Avoids plagiarism by citing sources and using own words to support claim.


      Not Yet:

      Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets."

      • Provide students with a note-taking method and template.
      • Discuss the term "relevant" and what it means stay on task—two demands embedded in the rubric.
      • Teach strategies for identifying and selecting source material in the form of quotes, passages, data, and so forth as it relates to a controlling idea and task.
      • Teach strategies for summarizing or paraphrasing.
  • Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing

      1 Day

      1. Organizing notes:

      Ability to prioritize and narrow notes and other supporting information.

      Sequenced note cards

      Sequence relevant information in your notes on which to build your claim.

      Meets:

      Provides a sequenced set of note cards that are organized to make the most compelling argument.


      Not Yet:

      Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets."

      • Students put notecards in a sequence from "strongest" to "weakest" or "most compelling" to "least compelling." 
      • Students discuss with a partner and state their positions, using their notecards to verbally support their claim.
      • Partners ask questions and make comments to help peers strengthen their argument.
      • Differentiation: Students who are doing L2 or L3 will discuss and make notes with a student who has a competing view. L3 students will research everyday life examples to support their claim.
  • Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process

      1-2 Days

      Initiation of task:

      Ability to create a thesis statement (claim) and consolidate information relevant to task.

      Paragraph with strong thesis

      Write an introduction paragraph that includes a thesis statement (claim) and sequences the key points you plan to make in your composition.

      Meets:

      Writes an introduction paragraph that establishes a controlling idea and identifies key points that support development of information and/or explanation.


      Not yet:

      Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets."

      • Teacher discusses thesis statement (claim) with students.
      • Students use notecard reasons to create a thesis statement or claim on another notecard (of a different color).
      Differentiation: Teacher gives thesis template to students:
      • "Adolescents should/should not be required to wear helmets during recreational activities because ___________, _____________, and ________________."
      • Demonstrate or provide a check-list for the "ingredients" of an opening paragraph (See "Introduction Recipe" handout).
      • Teacher models "introduction recipe" using a teacher/student created sample on interactive white board.
      • Students write their own introduction on a note card (another color).
      ** At the end of this step, students will have:
      •  Three reasons with details (3 cards)
      • Law of Motion involved with each reason (3 cards)
      • Thesis statement (claim) (1 card)
      • Introduction (1 card)

      3-4 Days

      2. Development:

      Ability to construct an initial draft supporting a thesis statement (claim).

      Rough draft

      Write an initial draft to include multiple paragraphs: an introduction, at least three body paragraphs (reasons with details, competing views, and real-life examples), and conclusion.

      Meets:

      Uses notecards to:

      Create an opening to include a thesis statement (claim). 

      Create an initial draft with all elements of the prompt addressed.


      Not Yet:

      Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets."

      • How to open and end an argumentation composition. 
      • Use of template for all levels to guide students through first draft.
      • Student-led revision session.

      2 Days

      3. Revision:

      Ability to apply revision strategies to refine development of argument, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as appropriate to audience and purpose.

      Revised draft

      Apply revision strategies for clarity, logic, language, and cohesion.

      Meets:

      Demonstrates use of revision strategies that clarify logic and development of ideas; embeds relevant details; improves word usage and phrasing; and creates smooth transitions between sentences and paragraphs.

      Applies a text structure to organize reading material content and to explain key points related to the prompt.


      Not Yet:

      Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets."

      • Develop ways to manage revision process so that students get feedback in timely and helpful ways.
      • Draft study (students volunteer a segment for class or small group help and discussion).
      • Peer feedback on clarity of thinking and development of claim/argument.
      • Read-aloud for peer and teacher feedback.
      • Strategies for embedding information—citation methods, quoting, paraphrasing.

      1-2 Days

      4. Editing:

      Ability to apply editing strategies and presentation applications.

      Final draft

      Finalize draft for the readership; apply finishing touches (e.g. visuals, neatness, formatting, copy editing).

      Meets:

      Demonstrates use of strategies that enhance the readability and appearance of the work for presentation.


      Not Yet:

      Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets."

      • Use of error analysis to encourage self-correction of language usage and grammatical errors. 
      • Use of copy-editing marks.
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