Discipline: Social Studies

Grade Level: 6th

Course: American History and Geography

©Literacy Design Collaborative. September 2011

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The Individual and the Community: My Responsibilities in a Time of Crisis
What
Instruction?
  • Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task
    • Click here to download a pdf version of Skills Cluster 1.

      Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task

      1 class period

      1. Bridging conversation

      Ability to understand the task and the seminar process.

      Short response

      Homework assignment—journal prompt: "What does community mean to you?"

      No scoring

      • Introduce module by briefly discussing the Essential Question—"What is the individual's proper response to a disaster?" (Post and leave up for display throughout the module).
      • Explanation of the writing task occurs later in the instructional ladder during "Transition to Writing."
  • Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process
    • Click here to download a pdf version of Skills Cluster 2.

      Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process

      1-2 class periods

      1. Reading for seminar

      Ability to read texts selected for seminar so as to participate in a question-based discussion to gain a deeper understanding of texts, topics or issue, and the seminar question.

      2. Essential vocabulary

      Ability to apply strategies for developing an understanding of a text by locating words and phrases that identify key concepts and facts, or information.

      3. Note-taking

      Ability to read purposefully and select relevant information; to summarize and paraphrase.

      a. KWL chart

      Develop a KWL chart completing the K & W sections to organize what you know about the Gulf oil spill and what readings might be interesting to you. (See Appendix for selections.)

      b. Written summaries of reading selections

      Write a summary of each selection in which you identify key ideas and values and make a connection to the essential question.

      a. Meets Expectations: Fills in KWL chart correctly and with clear references to selected texts. (See Resources.)

      Not Yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "Meets."

      b. Meets Expectations: Writes a summary for each selection identifying key ideas and values and makes a connection to the essential question.

      Not Yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "Meets."

      • Identify and teach vocabulary for ideas and values for discussion. (See p.26)
      • Students will engage in a group activity wherein they read four selections from the Module Casebook that will be used during this module. The Casebook contains four short readings from a variety of perspectives on the proper role of the relationship between the individual and society.
      • First, engage students in an inspectional read of the selection—take note of the structure, length, and key pieces of information.
      • Read the Marcus Aurelius text (see Student Reader in the Appendices) first together as a whole class. Review active reading strategies and interacting with the text (writing on text connections, questions, and reactions; underlining or circling important portions). Read text aloud, modeling for students your own thinking and explaining the meaning of several vocabulary words. Students may struggle somewhat with comprehension, so we discuss the meaning of the text as we read. Ask students to write a short summary of the text underneath the text.
      • Divide class into three heterogeneous "Reading Teams" to do a more in-depth analytical reading (see Adler and van Doren, How to Read a Book).
      • One reading is assigned to each team, so that they can use the "Four As"; Reading Protocol to analyze the text (see www.nsrfharmony.org—click on Resources and then Protocols).
      • Everybody in the group reads the text with a highlighter and marks:
        • Assumptions by author
        • Agree with
        • Argue with
        • Aspire to
      • The Reading Group discusses their individual responses with all group members taking notes. The Reading Groups then jigsaw into Discussion Groups in order to "teach" each selection to the rest of the class by sharing out on the texts in order. The goal is for all the students in the class to understand all selections in the Student Reader.
      • Students then share in jigsaw format.
  • Skills Cluster 3: Dialogue Process (Paideia Seminar)
    • Click here to download a pdf version of Skills Cluster 2.

      Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process

      1-2 class periods

      1. Reading for seminar

      Ability to read texts selected for seminar so as to participate in a question-based discussion to gain a deeper understanding of texts, topics or issue, and the seminar question.

      2. Essential vocabulary

      Ability to apply strategies for developing an understanding of a text by locating words and phrases that identify key concepts and facts, or information.

      3. Note-taking

      Ability to read purposefully and select relevant information; to summarize and paraphrase.

      a. KWL chart

      Develop a KWL chart completing the K & W sections to organize what you know about the Gulf oil spill and what readings might be interesting to you. (See Appendix for selections.)

      b. Written summaries of reading selections

      Write a summary of each selection in which you identify key ideas and values and make a connection to the essential question.

      a. Meets Expectations: Fills in KWL chart correctly and with clear references to selected texts. (See Resources.)

      Not Yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "Meets."

      b. Meets Expectations: Writes a summary for each selection identifying key ideas and values and makes a connection to the essential question.

      Not Yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "Meets."

      • Identify and teach vocabulary for ideas and values for discussion. (See p.26)
      • Students will engage in a group activity wherein they read four selections from the Module Casebook that will be used during this module. The Casebook contains four short readings from a variety of perspectives on the proper role of the relationship between the individual and society.
      • First, engage students in an inspectional read of the selection—take note of the structure, length, and key pieces of information.
      • Read the Marcus Aurelius text (see Student Reader in the Appendices) first together as a whole class. Review active reading strategies and interacting with the text (writing on text connections, questions, and reactions; underlining or circling important portions). Read text aloud, modeling for students your own thinking and explaining the meaning of several vocabulary words. Students may struggle somewhat with comprehension, so we discuss the meaning of the text as we read. Ask students to write a short summary of the text underneath the text.
      • Divide class into three heterogeneous "Reading Teams" to do a more in-depth analytical reading (see Adler and van Doren, How to Read a Book).
      • One reading is assigned to each team, so that they can use the "Four As"; Reading Protocol to analyze the text (see www.nsrfharmony.org—click on Resources and then Protocols).
      • Everybody in the group reads the text with a highlighter and marks:
        • Assumptions by author
        • Agree with
        • Argue with
        • Aspire to
      • The Reading Group discusses their individual responses with all group members taking notes. The Reading Groups then jigsaw into Discussion Groups in order to "teach" each selection to the rest of the class by sharing out on the texts in order. The goal is for all the students in the class to understand all selections in the Student Reader.
      • Students then share in jigsaw format.
  • Skills Cluster 4: Transition to Writing
    • Click here to download a pdf version of Skills Cluster 4.

      Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 4: Transition to Writing

      1 class period

      1. Transition to writing

      Ability to transition from readings and seminar to writing task.

      Short response and form

      Write a brief response in which you explain what the task is asking you to do. Fill out the rubric form, in which you paraphrase the rubric. (See appendix.)

      Meets Expectations: Writes a brief response accurately explaining the task and accurately paraphrasing rubric.

      Not Yet: Attempts to meet criteria for "meets."

      • Display Teaching Task for the first time and discuss for clarity.
      • Display and discuss the rubric.
  • Skills Cluster 5: Writing Process
    • Click here to download a pdf version of Skills Cluster 5.

      Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 5: Writing Process

      1 class period

      1. Initiation of task

      Ability to establish a claim and consolidate information relevant to task.

      Opening paragraph

      Write an opening paragraph in which you establish a claim and engage a younger audience.

      Meets Expectations: Writes an opening paragraph that establishes a credible claim and addresses a younger audience.

      Not Yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "Meets."

      • To practice analytical skills and delve deeper into the issue, have students view two images: the fire just after the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon and a bird covered in oil after the spill. Students used the Photographic Analysis Form from the Library of Congress. (http://memory.loc.gov/learn/lessons/98/brady/photo.html)
      • Brainstorming: "Chalk Talk"— the essential question is put on a large white board. Students are invited to stand around board and ponder silently. As students choose, they should write brief thoughts/responses/related notes on the board. The teacher may also write words/phrases/questions to continue to stimulate thinking. After 15-20 minutes, the teacher may signal for last call. After the chalk talk, the teacher may briefly discuss/debrief the process with students.
      • Outlining: Keep Chalk Talk notes displayed. The teacher provides a graphic illustration of paragraph structure:
        • Topic sentence—(Beginning)
        • Number and variety of sentences—(Middle)
        • All sentences related to, support of topic sentence
        • Concluding sentence—(End)

      Partial class period

      2. Planning

      Ability to develop a line of thought and text structure appropriate to task.

      Blueprint (draft outline) for a four- to six-paragraph letter-essay

      Prepare a blueprint for a four- to six-paragraph letter essay.

      Meets Expectations: Develops a blueprint (draft outline) for a four- to six-paragraph letter-essay that is on-task and includes key points for argument essay/letter.

      Not Yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "Meets."

      • Model blueprint method.
      • Display model for reference.
      • Discuss function of each paragraph using a template.

      2 class periods

      3. Development

      Ability to construct an initial draft with an emerging line of thought and structure.

      Initial draft

      Prepare a rough draft of four to six paragraphs that addresses the question and task.

      Not scored by teacher but subject to self-and peer-assessment.

      • Distribute the "Qualities of Good Writing and Editing Checklist" (Davis and Hill, The No-Nonsense Guide to Teaching Writing, 2003, Heinemann). Read through the qualities with the class, discuss, and provide time for students to ask questions. Students first read their own drafts, going through the Editing Checklist to check for errors. Students also look for the writing qualities in their own writing.
      • Students then trade drafts with another student and each writes two positive comments (things they liked) and one suggestion for improvement.
      • Feedback in small groups.
        1. Form heterogeneous groups of 3 students
        2. Provide each group with multiple copies of each group member's first draft
        3. Each member of the group reads his or her paper out loud in turn while the other members follow along, writing edits, suggestions, and questions as they go
        4. The first member of the group then listens while the other members offer feedback, especially about the structure—how the points are logically organized and connected
        5. Repeat the process with each of the other group members
        6. Group members give each member all the copies of his or her draft to use in revision

      1 - 2 class periods

      4. Revision

      Ability to apply revision strategies to refine development of argument, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as appropriate to audience and purpose.

      Second draft

      Prepare a second draft and include peer comments and suggestions.

      Meets Expectations: Student makes revisions based on peer and teacher feedback:

      • Clarity of claim
      • Clarity of each topic sentence
      • Relationship to topic sentences to claim
      • Effectiveness of conclusion

      Not Yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "Meets."

      Based on feedback, students make revisions with a focus on content:

      • Clarity of thesis statement
      • Clarity of each topic sentence
      • Relationship of topic sentence to thesis
      • Effectiveness of conclusion.

      Peer feedback:

        1. Break class up in to same heterogeneous groups of 3 students (as in Revision 1).
        2. Provide each group with multiple copies of each group member's second draft.
        3. Each member of the group reads his or her paper out loud slowly, pausing after each paragraph in turn, while the other members follow along, writing comments and questions as they go.
        4. The first member of the group then listens while the other members offer warm and cool feedback on the paper—on each of the following topics in turn.
        5. Repeat the process with each of the other group members.
        6. Group members give each member all the copies of his or her draft to use in revision.

      1 - 2 class periods

      5. Editing

      Ability to apply editing strategies and presentation applications.

      Third draft

      Prepare a draft that includes edits based on peer and teacher comments or notations.

      Meets Expectations: Demonstrates editing techniques and corrections in draft.

      Not Yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "Meets."

      • Editing made based on peer feedback: Sentence, paragraph, and essay structure (i.e. intro/main body/conclusion).
      • This draft includes mechanics of the essay.
      • Student volunteers read aloud their final drafts for the class and discuss, teasing out similarities and differences in views about the seminar question.
      Final Composition: Students turn in finished compositions for scoring and feedback.

      6. Extension

      Ability to apply the task to an experience involving non-school audiences and situations.

      (mandatory in LDC/Paideia modules)

      Teacher shares published final drafts with elementary grade students as well as adding to individual student portfolios.

      No scoring

      The point of this extension is to give the 6th grade students who are laboring through the writing process an authentic audience for their work. This will help less-motivated writers do the necessary work to make their letter-essays as powerful as possible.

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