Discipline: Science

Grade Level: 7

Course: Life Science

©Literacy Design Collaborative. September 2011

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Biodiversity
What
Instruction?
  • Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task


      Optional Pre-test:

      Administer classroom assessment as pre-test if the instructor needs to gather information.  




      1 period

      1. Task analysis:

      Ability to understand and explain the task’s prompt and rubric. 

      Short constructed response

      In your own words, write a brief explanation of what the task is asking you to do. What texts (non-fiction, informational, technical, data, maps) might you consider for this task?

      No scoring

      • Review each student’s response to ensure she/he understands the task. 
      • Have students share responses so that students can hear/know what their peers are doing. Encourage  students to help each other when appropriate.
      • Discuss in detail: the prompt, type of writing and structure, the product, and the rubric.
  • Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task

      2 periods

      1. Reading “habits of mind”

      Ability to select appropriate texts and understand reading strategies needed for the task.

      List of appropriate websites

      Identify sources you will use and note how each source relates to your task.

      Meets

      Selects appropriate text(s) for task.


      Not yet

      Attempts to meet the criteria for “meets.”

      • Demonstrate reading strategies relevant to a type of text to prepare students for next steps in the ladder.
      • Teacher distributes article entitled “What Is Biodiversity?” The article is read aloud as a class. Students circle unfamiliar words throughout the article. In pairs, students help each other understand or infer the meaning of the unfamiliar words. Teacher clarifies the meanings of words if necessary.
      • Teacher models highlighting. Students reread and highlight the article.
      • Students compare two articles — one useful, one not useful.
      • Teachers will provide students with a list of appropriate websites. Students select 2-3 useful websites from the list to be used as their sources. Students develop their document in Google Docs, identifying selected websites.
      • Provide students with template for bibliography and explain format and use.

      3 periods

      2. Note Taking:

      Ability to read purposefully and select relevant information; to summarize and/or paraphrase.

      Notes & short response

      Using a note-taking method, select information (passages, facts, data) relevant to the task; list (bullet) each source and note relevant information.

      What does “plagiarism” mean and what strategies can you use to avoid it?

      Meets

      Accomplishes task by selecting relevant source material to support controlling idea.

      Answers question about plagiarism correctly and provides appropriate strategies for avoiding it.

      Writes in readable prose.


      Not yet

      Attempts to meet the criteria for “meets.”

      • Teacher demonstrates appropriate summarizing strategies followed by guided practice.
      • Students take individual notes on the article entitled “What Is Biodiversity?”
      • Students compare their notes to a teacher example.
      • Review policy for plagiarism and develop students’ understanding of it.
      • Provide students with a note taking method(s) and template.
      • Discuss the term “relevant” and what it means stay on task — two demands embedded in the rubric.
      • Identify any gaps or unanswered questions as you read about your topic.

      1 period

      3. Organizing notes

      Ability to prioritize and narrow supporting information.

      Notes and graphic organizer

      Prioritize relevant information in your notes on which to build your sequence or process.

      Meets

      Provides a prioritized set of notes that connects points for logic structure or line of thought.

      Suggests implications drawn from information about the issue or topic. 

      Writes in readable prose.


      Not yet

      Attempts to meet the criteria for “meets.”

      • Students organize and prioritize notes on template provided by teacher.
  • Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing

      Pacing: 15 min

      1. Bridging conversation:

      Ability to prepare for composing process.

      Short response (with bullets) and class work

      In a quick-write, write about what you know now that you’ve read about _______(content). What strategies might you use to ensure your information is accurate?

      No scoring

      • Review professional or other samples of writing type and structure.
      • Deconstruct professional samples of the type of writing students will engage in: 
      • Demonstrate patterns of development (e.g., from most important to least important).
      • Note the difference between a claim and a controlling idea or thesis.
      • Note the difference between an “explanation” and an “argument.”
      • Analyze purpose and audience.
      • Analyze tone and language choices.
      • Evaluate effectiveness. Do you get the information and explanation you expect? Why?
      • Conduct a seminar on the prompt, key issue, or topic.
      • Conduct a value-line exercise to ensure students understand a range of issues or options.
      • Discuss the prompt and what students need to do to complete the writing portion.
      • Refer to the rubric — point out demands and qualities of performance.
  • Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process

      30 min

      1. Write an opening

      Ability to establish a controlling idea and consolidate information relevant to task.

      Paragraph

      Write a summary paragraph that includes a controlling idea and sequences the key points you plan to make in your composition.

      Meets

      Writes a concise summary statement or drafts an opening that establishes a controlling idea and identifies key points that support the development of information and/or explanation.

      Writes in readable prose.


      Not yet

      Attempts to meet the criteria for “meets.”

      • Show students summaries, abstracts, and/or opening paragraphs from professional work.
      • Demonstrate or provide a checklist for the “ingredients” of an opening paragraph and a range of approaches for establishing an informational composition.
      • Collectively write a summary demonstrating a controlling idea with key points that support the development of the explanation.

      2 periods

      2. Development

      Ability to construct an initial draft with an emerging line of thought and structure.

      Opening paragraph and first draft

      Draft an opening for your composition with one or more paragraphs that establishes the controlling idea and provides a lead in for your reader.  Write an initial draft to include multiple paragraphs: an opening, the development of your process, and an ending that includes  a comment, conclusion, or implication.

      Meets

      Provides an opening to include a controlling idea and an opening strategy relevant to the prompt.

      Provides an initial draft with all elements of the prompt addressed.

      Writes in readable prose.


      Not yet

      Attempts to meet the criteria for “meets.”

      • Teach writing in third person. Teacher provides examples and non-examples.
      • Teach how to craft a hook and thesis statement.
      • Teach organization of essay into three paragraphs.
      • Students develop initial draft in Google Docs. Students share initial draft with one other student and the teacher.

      3 periods

      3. Revision

      Ability to apply revision strategies to refine development of information or explanation, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as appropriate to audience and purpose.

      Revised drafts (two or more)

      Apply revision strategies for clarity, logic, language, cohesion (students should do at least two drafts).  

      Meets

      Demonstrates use of revision strategies that clarify logic and development of ideas; embeds relevant details; improves word usage and phrasing; and creates smooth transitions between sentences and paragraphs.

      Applies a text structure to organize reading material content and to explain key points related to the prompt.


      Not yet

      Attempts to meet the criteria for “meets.”

      • Instructions for students:
      • 1. Listen to your partner read his/her essay aloud to you. As you listen, point out any words or phrases that are unclear, and help your partner fix them.
      • 2. Read your partner’s paper a second time, quietly to yourself. Write a “yes” or “no” next to each FCA, according to whether or not it’s included in the essay.
      • Teacher adds comments and suggestions about focus and content into each student’s Google
        Doc.
      • Students review teacher comments and revise their papers.

      1 period

      4. Editing

      Ability to apply editing strategies and presentation applications.

      Next-to-final draft

      Finalize draft for the readership; apply finishing touches (e.g., visuals, neatness, formatting, copyediting).

      Meets

      Demonstrates use of strategies that enhance the readability and appearance of the work for presentation.


      Not yet

      Attempts to meet the criteria for “meets”

      • Use of error analysis to encourage self-correction of language usage and grammatical errors. 


      Final Draft

      Submit your final draft before or on due date for scoring and feedback.




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