Discipline: English

Grade Level: 10th grade

Course: English 3–4 and English 3–4 Accelerated

©Literacy Design Collaborative. September 2011

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Recognizing Human Rights Violations in Countries in Crisis
What
Task?
  • Background to Share With Students
    • The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was adopted by the UN General Assembly on 10 December 1948, was the result of the experience of the Second World War. With the end of that war, and the creation of the United Nations, the international community vowed never again to allow atrocities like those of that conflict to happen again. World leaders decided to complement the UN Charter with a road map to guarantee the rights of every individual everywhere. The document they considered, and which would later become the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, was taken up at the first session of the General Assembly in 1946. The Assembly reviewed this draft Declaration on Fundamental Human Rights and Freedoms and transmitted it to the Economic and Social Council "for reference to the Commission on Human Rights for consideration . . . in its preparation of an international bill of rights." The Commission, at its first session early in 1947, authorized its members to formulate what it termed "a preliminary draft International Bill of Human Rights." Later the work was taken over by a formal drafting committee, consisting of members of the Commission from eight States, selected with due regard for geographical distribution. (UN, n.d., retrieved from http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/history.shtml, April 6, 2012)

  • Task/Text
    • Teaching Task

      After researching various websites and informational texts on current countries in crisis, write a report that analyzes the human rights violations in a specific  country by applying the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and providing evidence to clarify your analysis. What conclusion or implications can you draw from your research? L2: In your discussion, address the credibility and origin of sources in view of your research topic. L3: Identify any gaps or unanswered questions. Include in-text citations and a works cited page.

      Reading Texts
      Extension (Optional)

      Compile students' reports into a collection to send to appropriate institution whose focus is tolerance education (e.g., Museum of Tolerance, Teaching Tolerance Magazine, etc.).

  • Content Standards
    • Standards Source: Number: Content Standards:

      Common Core ELA Standards

      CCSS L & S 1 a, b, & d

      Initiate and participate in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively

      a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas

      b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.

      d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

      CCSS L & S 4

      Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

      CCSS L & S 5

      (If students use PowerPoint) Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

      CCSS Lang1a&b

      Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar an usage when writing or speaking.

      a. Use parallel structure.*

      b. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

      CCSS Lang2a,b,c

      Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

      a. Use a semicolon (and perhaps a conjunctive adverb) to link two or more closely related independent clauses.

      b. Use a colon to introduce a list or quotation.

      c. Spell correctly.

      CCSS Lang 3a

      Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

      a. Write and edit work so that it conforms to the guidelines in a style manual (e.g., MLA Handbook, Turabian's Manual for Writers) appropriate for the discipline and writing type


      CCSS Lang 4a,b,c,d

      Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9–10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

      a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

      b. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy).

      c. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its etymology.

      d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).


      CCSS Lang 6

      Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

  • Reading Standards (for Informational or Explanatory)
    • "Built-In" Reading Standards "When Appropriate" Reading Standards (applicable in black)
      • 1- Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
      • 2- Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
      • 4- Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
      • 6- Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
      • 10- Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
      • 3- Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
      • 5- Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.
      • 7- Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
      • 8- Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
      • 9- Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
  • Writing Standards for Informational or Explanatory
    • "Built-In" Writing Standards "When Appropriate" Writing Standards (applicable in black)
      • 2- Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
      • 4- Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
      • 5- Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
      • 9- Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
      • 10- Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audience.
      • 1- Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
      • 3- Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
      • 6- Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.
      • 7- Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
      • 8- Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.
  • Scoring Rubric
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