Discipline: English/Language Arts 

Grade Level: 10th Grade

Course: English/Language Arts 

©Literacy Design Collaborative. September 2011

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Pandemic: Catch the Fever
What
Task?
  • Background to share with students:
    • After a decade of research, university and federal scientists reconstructed the 1918 influenza virus pandemic that had killed 50 million people worldwide. Hoping to learn more about the evolution of this virus, the United States Department of Health and Human Services published the full genome on the Internet, leading to a public safety outcry about the potential risks that the virus might be used against us as a weapon of biological warfare.

  • Task/Text
    • Teaching Task

      Which is more important: scientific freedom or the public's right to safety? After reading three articles on the sequencing and publishing of the genes for the 1918 flu pandemic, write an editorial that identifies a problem with sharing potentially dangerous scientific research in the public sphere and argue for a solution to this problem. Support your position with evidence from the texts. 

      L2: Be sure to examine competing views.

      L3: Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate

      Reading Texts
  • Content Standards
    • Standards Source: Number: Content Standards:

      Common Core State Standards English/Language Arts: Grades 9-10 Reading Informational Text

      ELA CCSS RI1 G9-10

      Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well inferences drawn from the text.

      ELA CCSS RI2 G9-10

      Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including and how emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. 

      ELA CCSS RI4 G9-10

      Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

      ELA CCSS RI5 G9-10

      Analyze in detail how an author's ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

      ELA CCSS RI8 G 9-10

      Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

      ELA CCSS R110 G9-10

      By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 9-10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding needed at the high end of the range.

      Common Core State Standards English Language Arts: Grades 9-10 Writing 

      ELA CCSS W1 G9-10

      Write arguments to support claims in analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

      1. Introduce precise claims, distinguish the claims from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claims, counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
      2. Develop claims and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level and concerns.
      3. Use words, phrases and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claims and counterclaims.
      4. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
      5. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
      ELA CCSS W4 G9-10

      Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 

      ELA CCSS W5 G9-10

      Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

      ELA CCSS W9 G9-10

      Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.

      1. Apply grades 9-10 reading standards to literature
      2. Apply grades 9-10 reading standards to literary nonfiction
      ELA CCSS W10 G0-10

      Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes and audiences.

      Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts: Speaking and Listening S

      ELA CCSS S&L 1
      1. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify or challenge ideas and conclusions
      2. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own view and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

      Career and Technological Education (CTE) Standards: Health Science and Medical Technology Industry Sector

      HSMT 4.4

      Understand the impact of enhanced technology, bioethics, epidemiology, and socioeconomics on the health care delivery system.

      HSMT 5.1

      Understand the systematic problem-solving models that incorporate input, process, outcome and feedback components.

      HSMT 5.3

      Examine multiple options for completing work tasks by applying appropriate problem-solving strategies and critical thinking skills to work-related issues.

      HMST 7.4

      Understand that individual actions and affect the larger community.

      HMST 8.4

      Understand the ways in which ethical considerations affect emerging technologies and their impact on society.

      HMST 9.3

      Understand how to organize and structure work individually and in teams for effective performance and the attainment of goals.

      Disciplinary Core Ideas: Engineering, Technology and Applications of Science

      ETAS 3, 9-12*

      Widespread adoption of technological innovations often depend on market forces or other societal demands, but it may also be subject to evaluation by scientists and engineers and to eventual government regulation.

      *From National Research Council. (2012). A Framework from K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas: Committed on Conceptual Framework for the New K-12 Science Education Standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Retrieved from http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=13165

  • Reading Standards for Argumentation
    • "Built-In" Reading Standards "When Appropriate" Reading Standards (applicable in black)
      • 1- Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
      • 2- Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
      • 4- Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
      • 10- Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
      • 3- Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
      • 5- Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.
      • 6- Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
      • 7- Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
      • 8- Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
      • 9- Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
  • Writing Standards for Argumentation
    • "Built-In" Writing Standards "When Appropriate" Writing Standards (applicable in black)
      • 1- Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
      • 4- Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
      • 5- Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
      • 9- Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
      • 10- Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audience.
      • 2- Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
      • 3- Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well- structured event sequences.
      • 6- Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.
      • 7- Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
      • 8- Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.
  • Teaching Task Rubric
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