Discipline: English/Language Arts 

Grade Level: 10th Grade

Course: English/Language Arts 

©Literacy Design Collaborative. September 2011

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Pandemic: Catch the Fever
What
Instruction?
  • Pre Module
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Pre Module

      1 day

      Period 1

      Pre-module

      Ability to identify characteristics of scientific texts

      one page quick write response

      list of characteristics of scientific texts


      What are the characteristics of scientific texts? Why do you think scientific texts are written in this manner?

      Standard addressed: ELA CCSS RI4 G9-10

      Meets:

      At least three characteristics listed

      For each characteristic, student has offered a reason why it is used

      Not Yet:

      Attempts but does not fulfill criteria for "meets"


      • Use main module text for discussion: Taubenberger, Jeffrey K., et al. "Characterization of the 1918 Influenza Virus Polymerase Genes." Letter. Nature 6 October 2005: 437. http://www.bi.ku.dk/dna/course/papers/L2.taubenberger.pdf
      • Student preview article in small groups or pairs, using Post-it notes to indicate text characteristics emblematic of scientific writing (examples: formal tone, scientific jargon, section headers that indicate experimentation, such as "results").
      • Teacher collects student evidence and gathers into a whole-class list (using round robin or other strategy); students copy teacher-generated list and indicate evidence found by classmates.
      • In groups, students discuss reasons why each characteristic might be used in scientific writing.
      • Individual students write written response for submission (in journals, next to notes).
      • Teacher should model Post-it strategy for students if this is unfamiliar: use a pre-marked page to keep modeling focused, and to highlight one characteristic of scientific text for students.
      • Teacher may also want to use a think-aloud to model the scanning strategy for pre-reading, focused on structure.
  • Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task

      1 Day

      Period

      1. Bridging Conversation

      Ability to connect the task and new content to existing knowledge, skills, experiences, interests and concerns.

      Completed K/W/L chart

      What do you know/want to know/what did you learn about pandemics?

      Standards addressed:

      ELA CCSS W10 G9-10

      CTE HSMT 4.4


      Meets: 

      Completed K/W/L chart containing correct information from NOVA resource


      Not yet:

      Incomplete chart

      Chart contains incorrect information

      • Students begin by filling out K/W in pairs or groups, based on prior knowledge and interest.
      • Teachers collects student "W" responses, generating a list of questions on the board.
      • Students and teachers watch clip together about 1918 influenza pandemic: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/body/1918-flu.html
      • Teacher returns to list, highlighting which "W" questions were answered by the clip.
      • Students watch clip one more time, answering their own questions and completing charts.
      • Teacher should watch clip ahead of time and have a list of questions generated to facilitate or prompt student discussion.

      1 Day

      Period 3

      2. Task Analysis

      Ability to understand prompt and rubric.

      Short response to prompt

      Read the task, rubric, and sample student essay. In your own words, write a brief explanation of what the task and rubric are asking you to do.  Explain what score you believe the sample essay would receive and why.

      Standards Addressed

      ELA CCSS R4 G9-10

      CTE HMST 9.3


      Meets:

      Response offers an explanation of the tasks and rubric requirements 

      Response answers the prompt question with a prediction and reasons whyResponse assigns a score to the student sample essay and provides reasons for this score


      Not yet:

      Attempts but does not meet 1–3 criteria for "meets"


      • Teacher and/or student read-aloud of task and student essay; review prompt.
      • Teacher models scoring the sample essay with the rubric (on document camera and projector) and writing in response to rubric score (think-aloud, write-aloud).
      • Review each student's response to ensure that he/she understands the task.
      • Have students share responses with partner to elicit/offer help, if needed.
      • Discuss in detail: the prompt, type of writing and structure, the product, and the rubric.
      • Read and annotate student example aligned to rubric criteria; have notes to work from for think-aloud/write-aloud.

      1/2 Day

      Period 4

      3. Project Planning (1)

      Ability to plan and produce a product and work through incremental steps.

      Module plan

      Create a personalized learning plan for this module that includes:

      • Questions you'd like to answer by the end of this module.
      • Specific literacy skills you'd like to develop by the end of this module (literacy learning goal).
      • Challenges you may face, given your current understanding of yourself as a learner.

      Standards addressed:

      ELA CCSS W5 G9-10

      CTE HMST 9.3


      Meets:

      Response responds to the prompt question with 

      Questions to answer by end of module

      Specific literacy learning goal or goals (at least one)

      Specific challenges predicted (at least one) 


      Not yet:

      Attempts but does not meet 1-3 criteria for "meets"

      • Teacher provides students with mini-task prompt (on board, on paper).
      • Students read the teaching task prompt, answering the mini-task questions at the bottom of the task description/assignment sheet.
      • Students use a group sharing structure (give-one-get-one, tea party) to share their responses with at least three other classmates, adding their peers' answers to their own.
      • Students complete a quick write in journal: What do you think you will learn by the end of this module? Share answer with a shoulder partner.
      • For remaining class period, students complete their module plan (to serve as a cover page for the completed task in their portfolio).
      • Prepare an organizer for group sharing and add this organizer to the bottom of the teaching task prompt/assignment description sheet.

      1/2 Day 

      Period 4

      4. Project Planning (2)

      Ability to plan to produce a product and work through incremental steps.

      Timeline

      Create a common timeline in order to complete the project.

      Standards addressed:

      CCSS W 5 (planning phase)

      CTE 9.3 (individual goal)


      Meets: 

      Fulfills scoring criteria or classroom guides for Student Learning Plan Goals and/or Portfolio Outcomes

      Timeline is realistic


      Not yet: 

      Attempts but does not fulfill criteria for "meets"

      Timeline is unrealistic or not present

      • Review scoring criteria or guidelines for Student Learning Plan Goals/Portfolio Outcomes, if necessary. Structure student creation of learning goals (organizer or selection of goals related to pathways learning outcomes).
      • As a class, record specific due dates onto the common timeline so that all students are aware of the deadlines. 
      • Establish a timeline for instruction and scoring.
      • Review or establish classroom structures for student goal setting, revision/review, and process monitoring (such as Student Learning Plans or Student Portfolios) and prepare a template for goal setting and timeline. 
      • Prepare a timeline template (other side of Student Learning Plan Goals organizer).
  • Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process

      2 days

      Period 5-6

      Active Reading 1

      Ability to read text explicitly; to analyze texts for specific purposes; to draw evidence from a relevant source.

      Journal free write (2)

      Article annotations (2 articles)


       What is the author's intent in writing this article, and how do you know?

      Standards addressed:

      ELA CCSS RI 1, G9-10

      ELA CCSS RI 2, G9-10

      CTE HSMT 5.2

      CTE HSMT 9.3

      CTE HSMT 7.4

      ETAS 3, 9-12*

      Meets:

      Student made at least one inference about the author's intent

      Student has used explicit evidence (quotation) from the text to support this inference

      Not Yet:

      Attempts to but does not yet meet the criteria for "meets" 

      • After using Philip Sharps' Science article to model on first day, and Ray Kurzweil's The New York Times article to model on the second day, teacher and students engage in the following close reading and annotation process (reader's workshop model) for paragraph one:
      • READ ALOUD: read paragraph aloud once for overall meaning. In journal, create a list of 3-5 ideas or images you remember or questions you have after this first reading.
      • READ FOR CONNECTIONS: read again for connections (text-to-self, text-to-text, text-to-world); annotate connections
      • READ FOR STRUCTURE: circle thesis and topic sentences, underline supporting evidence
      • READ FOR MEANING: What is the author saying (summarize)? Why did the author write this (inference)? Write responses to both in journals.
      • Teacher models each step for students, then allows students to work as a whole group, then with partners, to practice each step with paragraph two. Students complete remaining paragraphs on their own, with teacher circulating and offering 1:1 help and prompting. Return at end to reflect on process.
      • Teacher should have pre-read and annotated a version of the text to facilitate the annotation and think aloud for students (done "live" in front of the room, on SMART board or using document camera).

      2 Days

      Periods 7-8

      2. Active Reading II: Note Taking and Annotation

      Ability to summarize a texts and select/prioritize relevant evidence from the text.

      Journal free write (2)

      Article annotations (2 articles)

      What information are the authors presenting in this article, and what are the questions that still remain?

      Standards Addressed:

      ELA CCSS RI 1, G9-10

      ELA CCSS RI 2, G9-10

      CTE HSMT 5.2

      CTE HSMT 9.3

      CTE HSMT 8.4

      ETAS 3, 9-12*

      Meets:

      Student made at least one statement about the author's intent

      Student has made at least one statement about questions that remain

      Student has used explicit evidence from the text to support both statements (at least one quotation for each)

      Net Yet:

      Attempts to but does not yet meet the criteria for "meets" 

      • Using Monica Schoch-Sparks et. article to model on first day in preparation for the Jeffrey Taubenberger article on day two, teacher and students engage in the following close reading and annotation process (reader's workshop model) specific to high-challenge scientific text (disciplinary reader's workshop):
      • SKIM FOR STRUCTURE: Skim whole text for structure, predicting which sections of the text seem as though they will contain the most useful or easily accessed information (background, conclusion). Make predictions and a plan for where to start.
      • READ FOR CONNECTIONS: Read the sections that seem to contain the most useful information (findings, discussion).
      • READ FOR STRUCTURE: Circle specific conclusions/findings;, underline evidence presented, highlight or star questions.
      • READ FOR MEANING: What do the authors believe they now know to be true? What questions or problems still remain?
      • Teacher models each step for students, then allows students to work as a whole group, then with partners, to practice each step with paragraph two. Students complete remaining paragraphs on their own, with teacher circulating and offering 1:1 help and prompting. Return at end to reflect on process.
      • On day two, teacher should allow student groups more independent work time with the second article, prompting student groups and visiting each group for prolonged periods of time to study comprehension and reading strategies.
      • Teacher preparation Teacher should have pre-read and annotated a version of the text to facilitate the annotation and think aloud for students. If it is a very inclusive and helpful list, teacher should place the pre-module disciplinary characteristics list in a prominent location for these workshops, and should refer to it/make connections to it often.

      1 Day 

      Period 9

      3. Active Reading III: Disciplinary Literacy

      Ability to identify the stylistic characteristics of writing within the disciplines (scientific editorial).

      List of characteristics

      What are the characteristics of scientific editorials?

      Standards Addressed:

      ELA CCSS RI 2, G9-10

      ELA CCSS RI 4 G9-10

      ELA CCSS S&L 1c, 1d G9-10

      Meets:

      List contains at least five specific characteristics of scientific text

      For each characteristic, student has identified one quotation from an article as an example

      Not Yet

      Attempts but does not yet meet the criteria for "meets"

      • Teacher think aloud: identify one characteristic of a "scientific editorial" within the texts from the previous days' work.
      • Students work in groups of three with one of the previously read editorial texts (different texts per group), to identify three characteristics (with examples from text) that allow them to classify this text as a "scientific editorial."
      • Groups write each characteristic and example on a sentence strip or large sheet of paper and post in front of room.
      • Groups consider posted list and make three collaborative decisions to combine, summarize, or remove posted elements. Each group shares one decision in turn, and the teacher re-arranges accordingly (moving strips, etc.). A class list of characteristics emerges.
      • Students add any new elements on this class list to their personal lists.
      • Returning to group work time, students find examples of the identified characteristic in their article if the element is not on their original list (so that each characteristic has an example found by the group).
      • Teacher preparation Teacher may want to generate a list of characteristics ahead of time and/or complete the think aloud model, to support focused modeling and to ensure class generated list is complete.

      4 Days

      Period 5-8

      4. Essential Vocabulary

      Ability to apply strategies for developing an understanding of a text by locating words and phrases that identify key concepts and facts, or information.

      Vocabulary journal

      Vocabulary Journal w/organizer (Frayer model, etc.)*

      Standards Addressed:

      ELA CCSS RI 4 G9-10

      CTE HSMT 5.1

      Meets

      Students have completed all sections of vocabulary organizer for each text

      Not Yet

      Attempts but does not yet meet the criteria for "meets"

      STRATEGIC VOCABULARY for each article:

      • Teacher models how to find "challenging" words in a text (through read aloud and think aloud).
      • Teacher models word attack strategies "in the moment."
      • Teacher finds a word that does not respond to word attack (for example, find the root, use context clues) and models writing the word in the reader's journal organizer, noting this as a "development" word.
      • At the end of each class period, teacher keeps a running module word bank to capture all "development" words students have discovered in the articles.

      SUGGESTED WORD BANK:

      • Genome
      • Pathogen(ic)
      • Transmissible
      • Sequence (ing)
      • Virology
      • Virulence
      • Strain(s)
      • Synthesize (ing)
      • Communicable
      • Mutation
      • Stigmatization
      • Containment
      • Infectious
      • Disclosure
      • Deliberate
      • Avian
      • Vaccine
      • Variation

      Teacher preparation

      • *If teacher has not selected a specific vocabulary development model, one that supports both academic English development and the development of English as a second language is suggested: http://www.fcoe.net/ela/pdf/Vocabulary/Narrowing%20Vocab%20Gap%20KK%20KF%201.pdf
      • Teacher should have a word bank created for each article ahead of time to ensure the class-generated list is complete (add words that students missed to word bank and have students add these to their vocabulary organizers).

      1 Day

      Period 10

      5.Planning

      Ability to organize reading notes into an outline or organizer.

      Outline

      Create an outline based on your reading notes in which you answer the prompt (state your claim), sequence your points, and list your supporting evidence (quotations and paraphrases from the texts).

      L2: Include competing arguments

      L3: Include one or more examples of current or historical connections to topic or issue

      Standards Addressed:

      ELA CCSS RI 5, G9-10

      ELA CCSS RI 10 G9-10

      ELA CCSS W 1a G9-10

      ELA CCSS W 5 G9-10

      Meets:

      Outline includes all of the following elements:

      Claim is stated

      Points are listed and placed into a logical sequence

      For every point, at least one citation is included

      L2: At least one competing argument is included

      L3: At least one historical example is outlined

      Not Yet:

      Outline is missing one or more elements of "meets"

      • Teacher models the process used to make a claim, beginning with the teaching task/essential question and writing the answer as a claim with "because" statements. (What are the ways we might balance scientific freedom and the public's right to safety? I believe we can balance scientific freedom and the public's right to safety by not placing limits on the information that comes from research, because if we all have the same information, we can find solutions to any problem that arises, it is an equal playing field, and nobody can use open information as a weapon like you can with secret information") 
      • Students work in pairs to make a claim following the model.
      • Teacher brings students back to model a structured outline from the claim, attaching specific textual examples to each point.
      • Students continue to work in pairs to follow the model.
      • After teacher checks in with student pairs and overall with class, students complete the outlines independently.
      • Teacher should have created a claim and "because" statements that can be supported with evidence from the texts.
      • Teacher may also want to model the development of counterclaims, also supporting these within the text.
      • Depending on the level of challenge this task represents for students, this may be a two period process.
  • Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing

      1 Day

      Period 11

      1. Bridging Conversation (1)

      Ability to prepare for composing process.

      Claim examples

      Quick-write claim

      Write a claim that sets the stage for your composition, using the sentence structures of the "expert" editorial authors you've read.

      L2: and your own unique sentence structure

      Standards Addressed:

      ELA CCSS RI 5 G9-10

      ELA CCSS RI 8 G9-10

      ELA CCSS W 1a, 1b G 9-10

      ELA CCSS W 5 G9-10

      ELA CCSS W 9 G9-10

      ELA CCSS W10 G9-10

      ELA CCSS S&L 1d G9-10

      CTE HSMT 5.1


      Meets:

      Student has copied the claim from each "expert" text

      Student has rewritten "I believe" statement in style of each expert

      Group members have responded to each statement, indicating preference


      Net Yet:

      One or more "meets" criteria is missing or incomplete

      SENTENCE STUDY:
      Teacher models the following process, using a three column organizer, and selecting one of the "expert" texts from previous lessons:
      • Identify and copy the claim sentence from each text into the left column of a three column organizer (or divided notebook page). 
      • Determine what is similar and what is different about the style of each sentence in the left column; place analysis into middle column.
      • Write your own claim "in the style of" each author in the third column.
      • Students work in pairs to complete the process using the other "expert" texts, and then craft their own claims using expert models.
      • When complete, students switch sentences with a partner who determines which is more appealing to them as a reader, and why.
      • Students may also want to write a "unique" sentence of their own structure and design, to be vetted by a partner.
      • Teacher should predetermine models for ease and clarity.
      • For additional scaffolding, teacher may want to create a graphic organizer that lists each claim (preloaded), so students can focus on the writing portion of the mini-task (vs. the additional layer of finding claim). Students should have already found claims in previous lessons, however.

      1 Day

      Period 12

      2. Bridging Conversation (2)

      Ability to prepare for composing process.

      Annotated exemplar

      Quick-write

      What grade should this exemplar receive, and why do you think so?

      Standards Addressed:

      ELA CCSS RI 5 G9-10

      ELA CCSS RI 8 G9-10

      ELA CCSS W 1a, 1b G 9-10

      ELA CCSS W 5 G9-10

      ELA CCSS W 9 G9-10

      ELA CCSS S&L 1d G9-10


      Meets:

      Student writing exemplar is scored using the rubric

      Rubric has been highlighted to indicate numerical score by indicator

      Student writing exemplar has been annotated to provide evidence for each indicator


      Net Yet:

      Student writing has not been scored

      Exemplar and/or rubric have not been annotated or annotations are incomplete

      • Teacher hands out student writing exemplar (response to teaching tasks) and the scoring rubric.
      • Teacher models rubric scoring for students, highlighting the correct indicator on the rubric and finding examples for each descriptor and numbering these examples in the exemplar.
      • Students repeat the process in groups, arguing for their scores using evidence from the exemplar.
      • Groups share their scoring categories and "norm" with teacher support, to determine the final score for the essay, as well as suggestions for improvements to the author.
      • Teacher Preparation Find or create a student exemplar that will "meet expectations" overall, with some variation to support students arguing for their position in groups.
  • Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process

      1/2 Day

      Period 13

      Establishing Claim (1)

      Ability to establish a claim and develop a line of thought supportive of claim.

      Quick-write, Draft claim

      Which of the claims you created yesterday do you believe is the strongest? Why do you think so?

      Standards Addressed:

      ELA CCSS RI 8 G9-10

      ELA CCSS W 1a, 1b G 9-10

      ELA CCSS W 5 G9-10

      ELA CCSS W 9 G9-10

      ELA CCSS S&L 1d G9-10

      Meets:

      Claim has been selected and written in the form of a thesis statement (using "expert" model or not)

      Student has written a free-write response to the prompt, reflecting on the strength of their claim

      Net Yet:

      Attempts to but does not yet meet the criterion for "meets"

      • Teacher presents the following criteria to students and uses the criteria to determine which claim (written by teacher, using "expert models" in period 11) is the strongest :
      • Must be an argument or proposal
      • Must be credible and fair
      • Must appeal to or "hook" the audience (determined by pair feedback)
      • Must present a counter claim (*may be optional)
      • In writing groups*, students vet their claim statements from period 11 against the criteria.
      • Students select a claim they will use for the essay, based on this discussion.
      • Student volunteers share their claims.
      • Teacher should create three sample claims to use for modeling.
      • * Teacher may want to create writing groups for use today and throughout the rest of the writing and editing process.

      1/2 Day

      Period 13

      Establishing Claim (2)

      Ability to establish a claim and develop a line of thought supportive to claim.

      Revised Outline

      Did your outline fit the claim you decided to develop? What did you need to change or revise?

      Standard(s) Addressed:

      ELA CCSS RI 5, G9-10

      ELA CCSS RI 10 G9-10

      ELA CCSS W 1a G9-10

      ELA CCSS W 5 G9-10

       

      Meets:

      Outline includes all of the following elements:

      Claim meets criteria and is well-aligned to evidence

      Points are listed and placed into a logical sequence

      For every point, at least one citation is included

      L2: At least one competing argument is included

      L3: At least one historical example is outlined

       

      Not Yet:

      Attempts but does not reach "meets"

      • Instructional strategies/ notes    Teacher models the revision process for outline created in period 10, beginning by placing the well-developed claim into the outline, then checking points, citations, competing arguments and historical examples against it.
      • Students work in pairs to revise and align their outlines.
      • Teacher makes sure to have completed an outline based on criteria for period 10, in order to revise into current criteria as a demonstration model.

      2 Days

      Period 14-15

      Initial Draft

      Ability to construct an initial draft with an emerging line of thought and structure.

      Rough Draft

      Using your outline, write a rough draft of your essay consisting of 5–6 paragraphs (introduction + 3–4 body paragraphs [including counterargument and/or historical evidence] + conclusion).

      Standards Addressed:

      ELA CCSS W1b, 1c, 1d G9-10

      ELA CCSS W9 G9-10

      ELA CCSS W10 G9-10

       

      Meets:

      Rough draft must be 5–6 paragraphs in length

      Rough draft must contain an introduction, 3–4 body paragraphs, and a conclusion

      Rough draft must contain a minimum of two references from the list of texts

       

      Not Yet:

      Attempts but does not yet reach "meets"

      • DAY ONE:
      • Teacher uses "TEST" strategies to model the construction of body paragraphs:
      • Topic sentence
      • Evidence
      • Significance
      • Transition
      • Students practice model in pairs, then transition to independent writing.
      • Teacher conferences with students.
      • DAY TWO: 
      • Teacher models strategies to embed evidence (including quotation, parenthetical citation, and analysis of quotation/paraphrase) into paragraphs.
      • Students practice model in pairs, then transition to independent writing.
      • Teacher conferences with students.
      • Teacher Preparation    Teacher should have some examples of correct quotation and paraphrase citations available for student writers, either on posters throughout the room or as a handout—to which students can refer during writing process.
      • Revision will begin on period 16, so students who do not emerge from this period with a complete draft should complete their work as homework.
      • Teacher should make writer's workshop format expectations (word processed and printed, double spaced, large margins for notes, etc.) available to students by end of period.

      1 Day

      Period 15

      Revisions (1)

      Ability to apply revision strategies to refine development of argument, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as appropriate to audience and purpose.

      Annotated rough draft, Quick-write

      What was the most important suggestion for feedback you received from your writing group today, and what will you change based on this feedback?

      Standards Addressed:

      ELA CCSS W4 G9-10

      ELA CCSS W5 G9-10

      ELA CCSS RI5 G9-10

      ELA CCSS RI 8 G9-10

      CTE HSMT 5.1

       

      Meets:

      Draft has been annotated using color coding

      Student has responded to the color coded annotations with a reflection about the helpfulness of peer support and next steps.

       

      Not Yet:

      Draft has not been annotated or submitted

      Student has not reflected, or reflection does not address the annotations

      • Teacher models the following color coded highlights for macro-editing, using student exemplar:
      • Yellow highlight for summary
      • Pink highlight for claim and counter-claim
      • Green highlight for evidence
      • Blue highlight for analysis
      • Teacher models expectations for well-structured writing and how students can make constructive suggestions to their peers based on the coding (teacher can also provide sentence stems to support conversation). There should be very little yellow; green should be "balanced" with blue."
      • Writing groups meet to edit papers.
      • Teacher supports groups by visiting each for a specific amount of time.
      • Students who have not completed the draft should work to complete their drafts at another table/tables.
      • Teacher may want to offer overall patterns and trends noticed in group sessions.
      • For groups that find constructive criticism challenging or who are new to this process, teacher may want to create sentence stems with blanks to support this conversation. ("Based on the amount of summary compared to analysis in your editorial, I would suggest______")

      1 Day

      Period 17

      Revisions (2)

      Ability to apply revision strategies to refine development of argument, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as appropriate to audience and purpose.

      Edited rough draft, Quick-write

      Which suggestions from your group were easy to change in your draft, and which were challenging?

      Standards Addressed:

      ELA CCSS W4 G9-10

      ELA CCSS W5 G 9-10

      ELA CCSS W10 G9-10

       

      Meets:

      Student has completed a coherent rough draft

       

      Net Yet:

      Attempts but does not yet reach "meets"

      • Teacher models using "peer" comments to revise a draft for overall structure, inclusion of evidence, and analysis.
      • Students work independently, meeting with teacher for individual writer's conferences (scheduled or as needed).
      • Teacher should end the day reviewing the expectations for tomorrow's workshop (micro-editing) including format and copies needed.
      • Teacher needs to create a "peer edited" draft for use in modeling.

      1 Day

      Period 18

      Editing (1)

      Ability to apply editing strategies and presentation applications.

      Edited rough draft, Quick-write

      What was the most important suggestion for feedback you received from your writing group today, and how will you change your draft based on these suggestions?

      Standards Addressed:

      ELA CCSS RI2 G9-10

      ELA CCSS W1c, 1d G9-10

      ELA CCSS W4 G9-10

      ELA CCSS W5 G9-10

      CTE HSMT 5.1

       

      Meets:

      Student has received a proofread draft

      Student has reflected on the changes to be made based on proofreading

       

      Not Yet:

      Draft has not been proofread or submitted

      Student has not reflected, or reflection does not address the comments

      • Teacher models micro-editing, using selected strategy (proofreading marks, reader response).
      • Students work in writer's groups to proofread, with teacher support in groups.
      • Teacher "catches" workshop near end of day to model moving from proofreading to editing.
      • Students write reflection; if there is time, they begin to revise based on peer comments.
      • Teacher should determine a structure for micro-editing and should offer students support with this level of feedback. It can be difficult for students struggling with academic English or English as a second language to do sentence level editing of peer papers. You may want to identify a target error and have students search for this error, or you may want to offer students a "proofreading checklist," asking them to identify run-on sentences, quotations with no citations, etc.

      1 Day

      Period 19

      Editing (2)

      Ability to apply editing strategies and presentation applications.

      Edited rough draft. Quick-write

      Which suggestions from your group were easy to change in your draft, and which were challenging?

      Standards Addressed:

      ELA CCSS W4 G9-10

      ELA CCSS W5 G 9-10

      ELA CCSS W10 G9-10

       

      Meets:

      Student has completed a coherent rough draft

       

      Not Yet:

      Attempts but does not yet reach "meets"

      • Teacher models using "peer" comments to revise a draft for micro details (spelling, word choice, punctuation, citations).
      • Students work independently, meeting with teacher for individual writer's conferences (scheduled or as-needed).
      • Teacher should end the day reviewing the expectations final draft submission.
      • Teacher needs to create a "peer edited" draft for use in modeling.

      1 Day

      Period 20

      Final Composition

      Ability to check final product against essential questions, module targets, and learning goals.

      Free-write reflection based on learning goals (created period 4)

      Did you meet your learning goals in this module?
      Questions you'd like to answer by the end of this module.
      Specific literacy skills you'd like to develop by the end of this module (literacy learning goals).

      Challenges you may face, given your current understanding of yourself as a learner. 

      Standards Addressed:

      ELA CCSS W10 G9-10

      CTE HMST 9.3

       

      Meets:

      Student has submitted a final editorial essay

      Student has reflected on his/her work in the module, addressing the learning plan created in period 4

       

      Not Yet:

      Attempts but does not yet meet criteria for "meets"

      • Students read and reflect on their learning goals and create a reflection to be submitted with their final products.
      • Teacher may want to provide a model reflection for students who are not yet familiar with reflection or learning plans.
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