Discipline: Social Studies

Grade Level: 10, 11, 12

©Literacy Design Collaborative. September 2011

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The Great War: Evaluating the Treaty of Versailles
What
Instruction?
  • Skills Cluster 1 Preparing for the Task
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task


      TASK ENGAGEMENT

      Ability to connect the task and new content to existing knowledge, skills, experiences, interests, and concerns.

      LIST

      In a quick-write, write your first reaction to the task prompt. Add some notes of things you know about this issue.

      No scoring

      • Link this task to earlier class content.
      • Discuss student responses.
      • Clarify timetable and support plans for the task.

      Duration: Ongoing

      TASK ANALYSIS

      Ability to understand and explain the task's prompt and rubric.

      NOTES

      Prompt:

      In your own words, write a brief explanation of what the task is asking you to do.


      Rubric:

      Students will translate the rubric in their own words.


      No scoring

      • Students share responses so they can hear how others are interpreting the task. Encourage students to help each other when appropriate.
      • Rubric Translation Activity — Introduce rubric to class. In small groups, students will translate their assigned piece of the rubric in their own words. Students will then participate in a jigsaw and gallery walk to share and take notes on rubric translations.
      • Extra Support — Specifically organize groups to provide ideal peer support for students who need it.
      • Teacher Work — Review student responses in task analysis and quick-write to ensure they understand the task and identify those who need more support.
  • Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process

      Duration: 60 minutes

      TEXT SELECTION:

      Ability to identify appropriate texts.

      NOTES

      1) What strategies do you use to help you process your reading?

      2) What information do you already know about the topic of the introductory article: “What are your rights?”

      List of 3-4 strategies for reading.

      Participates in class discussion of reading strategies and current knowledge of article topic.

      Fills out “Give One, Get One” activity.

      • Have individual students write down one or two strategies they use to understand what they read.
      • Students get in pairs to share their responses. Students will then add three other strategy ideas gleaned from their classmates to their lists.
      • Teacher uses handout for “Give One, Get One” activity.
      • Teacher creates a class list of reading strategies and content knowledge from the first article.
      • Teacher can add reading strategies to the wall chart to remind students of the strategies.

      Duration: 45 minutes

      ACTIVE READING:

      Ability to identify the central point and main supporting elements of a text.

      NOTES

      1) What strategies do you use to help you process your reading?

      2) What information do you already know about the topic of the introductory article: “What are your rights?”

      List of 3–4 of strategies for reading.

      Participates in class discussion of reading strategies and current knowledge of article topic.

      Fills out “Give One, Get One” activity.

      • Teacher has handout or interactive slideshow prepared with key terms and events for World War I. Students record notes in the Vocabulary Notes section of their Writer’s Notebook.
      • Students read the first article “Treaty of Versailles: Was Germany Guilty?”
      • Instructions should be very explicit and include group work, partner work, and teacher modeling.
      • Teacher reads the first two sentences of the article, modeling active reading and strategies.
      • Students finish reading the rest of the article using a “think aloud” process with a partner.
      • Students create a list of vocabulary that they struggled with and the class discusses strategies for understanding words in context.
      • Students record new vocabulary in the Vocabulary Notes section of their 
        Writer’s Notebook.
      • Students actively read the following three articles independently as well as with some teacher guidance.
      • Reflection in student pairs.


      ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

      Ability to use and credit sources appropriately.

      SHORT CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE

      Define "plagiarism" and list ways to avoid it.

      Provides accurate definition of plagiarism. Source: http://www.indiana.edu/~citing/APA.pdf

      Lists several appropriate strategies for avoiding plagiarism. Source: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/

      • Teacher and students discuss respect for others’ work to assemble evidence and create texts.
      • Discuss academic penalties for stealing others’ thoughts and words.
      • Teacher gives students a handout with examples of how to cite within an essay and a sample citation page.


      NOTE TAKING

      Ability to read purposefully and select relevant information; to summarize and/or paraphrase.

      NOTES

      In their notebooks, students list words and phrases essential to the texts they are reading and add definitions and notes on connotation in this context.

      Summaries contain “who, what, where, when and why.”

      Focus questions have an appropriate response — emerging or clear opinion is evident.

      Writes in readable prose.

      • Teacher provides a brief review of summary writing strategies.
      • Teacher uses a variety of reading and writing activities to help students improve processing skills of main idea and significance.
      • 25-word summary.
      • Metacognitive Log — skip novel-based questions. 
      • Students get independent work time to respond to focus questions on
        Metacognitive Log after completing the summary.
      • Focus questions should lead students to begin considering aspects of the article’s subject. When possible, students should discuss responses in pairs or as a group.
      • Extra Support — These activities are designed to provide support for all reading levels.
  • Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing

      Duration: 60 minutes

      BRIDGING

      Ability to begin linking reading results to writing task.

      LIST

      In a quick-write, write about what you know now that you’ve read about (content).

      No scoring

      • Teacher reviews professional or other samples of writing type and structure.
      • Students deconstruct and evaluate the article “Hitler’s Speech on the Treaty of Versailles” using the rubric to guide their critique.
      • Demonstrate patterns of development (e.g., from most important to least important).
      • Note the difference between an “explanation” and an “argument.”
      • Evaluate effectiveness — Do you get the information and explanation you expect? Why?
      • Discuss the process for writing the essay.
      • Students will fill out the Planning Chart Organizer.
      • Extra Support — Struggling readers should focus on fewer rubric components such as reading and research and the controlling idea.
  • Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process


      CONTROLLING IDEA

      Ability to establish a controlling idea and consolidate information relevant to task.

      SHORT CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE

      1) Students will write their claim in their Writer’s Notebook using quick-writes, notes, and article information to ensure a strong controlling idea.

      2) Students will write a draft introduction that will set the context for their claim.

      Writes a claim that establishes a controlling idea and identifies key points that support development.

      Writes a draft introduction that sets an appropriate context for the claim.

      Writes in readable prose.

      • Before students write their formal claim, teacher reviews qualities of a strong claim as a class:
      • Must be an argument, include simple defense of the argument, and include categories to lead reader and organize essay.
      • In pairs, students will use a peer editing chart to edit sample claim statements provided by the teacher.
      • Class goes over each thesis statement; teacher asks for volunteers to identify the strong and weak characteristics of each statement.
      • After students have finished writing a formal claim, teacher reviews the qualities of a strong opening paragraph: HOTT (Hook, Overview, Thesis, Transition).
      • In pairs, students share their claim statements and introduction. Student volunteers share their claim and introduction with the class for critique.

      Duration: 60 minutes

      PLANNING

      Ability to develop a line of thought and text structure appropriate to an information/explanation task.

      OUTLINE

      Create an outline including key elements drawn from your research and order them in some logical way (e.g., chronologically, sequentially).

      Applies an outline strategy to develop reasoning for argument.

      Draws a credible implication from information about the differences between economic systems.

      Writes in readable prose.

      • Teacher reviews text requirements: Students must use evidence from a minimum of three different texts in their essay.
      • Students independently write an outline using the template in their Writer’s
        Notebook.
      • In small groups, students share how they will organize their essays.
      • Extra Support — Students will focus on providing evidence from only one or two texts in their outline.

      Duration of lesson section

      DEVELOPMENT

      Ability to construct an initial draft with an emerging line of thought and structure.

      LONG CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE

      Write a rough draft of your essay consisting of 4–5 paragraphs. Includes an introduction, 2–3 body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

      Demonstrates use of revision strategies that clarify logic and development of ideas; includes relevant details; improves word usage and phrasing; and creates smooth transitions between sentences and paragraphs.

      Applies a text structure to organize reading material content and to explain key
      points related to the prompt.

      • Teacher reviews strategies for constructing body paragraphs: TEST (Topic sentence, Evidence, Significance, and Transition).
      • Teacher creates stations where students can get guidance on certain aspects of the essay: introduction, claim, evidence and analysis, and conclusion.
      • Teacher assigns a strong student-writer at each station to help guide discussion and provide peer review. Teacher spends time at each station assisting students.
      • Teacher will provide the “Hamburger” Graphic Organizer for constructing paragraphs for students to use at each station.
      • Extra Support — Teacher leads “station” for students who need extra support in developing the essay.

      Duration: 60 minutes

      REVISION

      Ability to refine text, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as appropriate to audience and purpose.

      LONG CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE

      Apply revision strategies for clarity, logic, language, cohesion, appearance, and conventions.

      Provides complete draft with all parts.

      Supports the opening in the later sections with evidence and citations.

      Improves earlier edition.

      • Students give each other feedback on rough drafts using the “peer review template”
        and handout from teacher.
      • Teacher instructs students on the use of e-mail to submit essays for efficient and basic feedback from the teacher.
      • Teacher discusses strategies for citing information using the Writer’s Notebook — MLA citation methods, quoting, paraphrasing. Source: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/

      Duration: 60 minutes

      EDITING

      Ability to proofread and format a piece to make it more effective.

      LONG CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE

      Apply revision strategies for clarity, logic, language, cohesion, appearance, and conventions.

      Provides complete draft with all parts.

      Supports the opening in the later sections with evidence and citations.

      Improves earlier edition.

      • Students give each other feedback on rough drafts using the “peer review template”
        and handout from teacher.
      • Teacher instructs students on the use of e-mail to submit essays for efficient and basic feedback from the teacher.
      • Discuss strategies for citing information using the Writer’s Notebook — MLA citation methods, quoting, paraphrasing. Source: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/


      COMPLETION

      Ability to submit final piece that meets expectations.

      LONG CONSTRUCTED RESPONSE

      Turn in your complete set of drafts, plus the final version of your piece.

      Fits the “Meets Expectations” category in the rubric for the teaching task.


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