Discipline: Science

Grade(s)/Level: 7th Grade

Course: Life Science

©Literacy Design Collaborative. September 2011

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Using Classification to Investigate Living Organisms
What
Instruction?
  • Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task
    • Click here to download a pdf version of Skills Cluster 1.

      Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task

      30 - 40 minutes

      1. Task engagement

      Ability to connect the task and new content to existing knowledge, skills, experiences, interests, and concerns.

      Product:

      Flip Book

      Prompt:

      Using your Classification Flip Book, define the domains and kingdoms for organisms of your choice, and provide examples of organisms in each group.

      None

      • Review each student's response to ensure she/he understands the task. Ensure relevant reading material is selected or provided.
      • Have students share responses so that students can hear/know what each other is doing, and encourage them to help each other when appropriate.
      • Discuss in detail the prompt, type of writing and structure, the product, and the rubric.

      20 minutes

      2. Task analysis

      Ability to understand and explain the task's prompt and rubric.

      Product:

      Short response

      Prompt:

      In a quick write, explain your first reaction to the task prompt. What strategies might you use to gain knowledge of organisms and the system of classification?

      None

      • Have students identify various objects as abiotic or biotic; share responses and collaborate to see what organelles they may have forgotten about or did not know.
      • Teach or review content required for the task depending on when in the sequence you teach the content—before or during the production of the task.
  • Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process
    • Click here to download a pdf version of Skills Cluster 2.

      Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process

      1 period plus homework, if necessary

      1. Text selection

      Ability to identify appropriate texts and understand necessary reading strategies needed for the task.

      Product:

      None

      Prompt:

      Read the following articles on the various organisms http://class.dogonews.com/cheney

      None

      • Coach students in reading scientific articles—identifying key vocabulary, captions, and conclusions.

      30 minutes

      2. Essential vocabulary

      Ability to identify and master terms essential to understanding a text

      Product:

      Vocabulary notebook entries with classification list

      Prompt:

      In your notebook, identify key words or phrases as you read and define them. Add terms we identified as the "language of the discipline." Note domains and six kingdoms (Archea, Bacteria, Eukarya) (Eubacteria, Archeabacteria, Animal, Plan, Fungi, Protist)

      Meets: Identifies vocabulary and notes classifications correctly. Writes in readable prose.

      Not Yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets."

      • Review classification system.
      • Use of dictionary and other sources to acquire understanding.

      1 period

      3. Note-taking

      Ability to select important facts and passages for use in one's own writing.

      Product:

      Notes

      Prompt:

      Take and organize notes from reading materials and organize elements into classification system (domains and kingdoms) in preparation for lab report.

      Meets: Prepares notes in with correct classification system.

      Not Yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets."

      • Provide students with a note taking method(s) and template.
      • Identify any gaps or unanswered questions as you do you read about your topic.
      • Teach strategies for summarizing or paraphrasing.
  • Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing
    • Click here to download a pdf version of Skills Cluster 3.

      Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing

      30 minutes

      1. Bridging

      Ability to begin linking reading results to writing task

      Product:

      Short response (with bullets) class work

      Prompt:

      In a quick write, explain what you know now that you've read about the classification system. What strategies will you use to write your report?

      None

      • Review professional or other samples of writing type and structure.
      • Deconstruct professional samples of the type of writing students will engage in:
        • Demonstrate patterns of development (e.g., from most important to least important).
        • Note the difference between a claim and a controlling idea or thesis.
        • Note the difference between an "explanation" and an "argument."
        • Analyze purpose and audience.
        • Analyze tone and language choices.
        • Evaluate effectiveness. Do you get the information and explanation you expect? Why?
      • Discuss the prompt and what students need to do to complete the writing portion.
      • Discuss rubric—point out demands and qualities of performance. Students paraphrase rubric in their own words.
  • Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process
    • Click here to download a pdf version of Skills Cluster 4.

      Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process

      Homework, review in class

      1. Initiation of task

      Ability to establish a controlling idea and consolidate information relevant to task.

      Product:

      Paragraph and outline

      Prompt:

      Write a summary paragraph that includes a controlling idea and sequences the key points you plan to make in your composition.

      Meets: Writes a concise summary statement and outline that establishes a controlling idea and identifies key points that support development of information and/or explanation. Writes in readable prose.

      Not Yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets."

      • Show students' summaries and abstracts or opening paragraphs from professional work.
      • Demonstrate or provide a checklist for the "ingredients" of an opening paragraph, such as author's name, etc. and a range of approaches for establishing an informational composition.
      • Collectively write a summary demonstrating a controlling idea with key points that support the development of the explanation.

      1 period and homework, if necessary

      2. Development

      Ability to construct an initial draft with an emerging line of thought and structure.

      Product:

      Opening paragraph and first draft

      Prompt:

      Redraft an opening for your composition with one or more paragraphs that establishes the controlling idea and provides a lead in for your reader. Write an initial draft to include multiple paragraphs: an opening, development of your process, an ending to include a comment, conclusion, or implication.

      Meets: Provides an opening to include a controlling idea and an opening strategy relevant to the prompt. Provides an initial draft with all elements of the prompt addressed. Writes in readable prose.

      Not Yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets."

      • Demonstrate how to open and end an informational/explanatory composition.
      • Use template for all levels to guide students through first draft.
      • Facilitate student-led revision session.

      1 period

      3. Revision

      Ability to refine text, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as appropriate to audience and purpose.

      Product:

      Revised drafts (2 or more)

      Prompt:

      Apply revision strategies for clarity, logic, language, cohesion (students should do at least 2 drafts).

      Meets: Demonstrates use of revision strategies that clarify logic and development of ideas, embeds relevant details; improves word usage and phrasing, and creates smooth transitions between sentences and paragraphs. Applies a text structure to organize reading material content and to explain key points related to the prompt.

      Not Yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets."

      • Develop ways to manage revision process so that students get feedback in timely and helpful ways.
      • Draft study (students volunteer a segment for class or small group help and discussion).
      • Have peers provide feedback to each other on clarity of thinking and development of claim/argument.
      • Read aloud for peer and adult feedback.
      • Use strategies for embedding information—citation methods, quoting, paraphrasing.

      30 minutes

      4. Editing

      Ability to proofread and format a piece to make it more effective.

      Product:

      Final draft

      Prompt:

      Finalize draft for the readership; apply finishing touches (e.g. visuals, neatness, formatting, copy editing).

      Meets:Demonstrates use of strategies that enhance the readability and appearance of the work for presentation.

      Not Yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets."

      • Use error analysis to encourage self-correction of language usage and grammatical errors.
      • Use copyediting marks.

      5. Completion

      Ability to submit final piece that meets expectations.

      Product:

      Final Piece

      Prompt:

      Turn in your complete set of drafts, plus the final version of your piece.

      Fits the "Meets Expectations" category in the rubric for the teaching task.

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