Discipline: Science

Grade Level: 10th-12th

Course: Chemistry

©Literacy Design Collaborative. September 2011

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Plastics…to Use or Not to Use?
What
Instruction?
  • Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task
    • Click here to download a pdf version of Skills Cluster 1.

      Pacing Skill and Definition Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...) Instructional Strategies

      Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task

      10 - 15 minutes

      1. Bridging conversation

      Ability to establish knowledge base and assess skills and strategies necessary to manage task.

      Prompt: Does the use of plastics in food and drink containers pose a serious threat to human health? After reading scientific sources, write a report that addresses the question and support your position with evidence from the texts. Be sure to acknowledge competing views. Give examples from past or current events or issues to illustrate and clarify your position.

      Product: Discussion/student feedback

      No scoring

      • Give students prompt and discuss the expectations by the end of the unit.

      10 - 15 minutes

      2. Begin instructional sequence

      Ability to understand and explain the teaching task's prompt and rubric.

      Prompt: Have students bring in two articles, one that argues for the use of plastics and one that argues against the use of plastics, so we can have a brief discussion about what you've read.

      Product: Class discussion

      No scoring

      • Review each student's articles to ensure that relevant reading material is selected or provided.
      • Have students share ideas so that students can hear/know what one other are doing, and encourage them to help each other when appropriate.
      • Discuss in detail the prompt, type of writing and structure, the product, and the rubric.

      10 - 15 minutes

      3. Student project planning

      Ability to plan a task so that reading and writing processes are accomplished on time.

      Prompt: Given a timeline—discuss with students.

      Product: Student discussion

      No scoring

      • Model a common or sample timeline and homework.
      • Provide students with a timeline template.
      • Discuss the importance of planning.
  • Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process
    • Click here to download a pdf version of Skills Cluster 2.

      Pacing Skill and Definition Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...) Instructional Strategies

      Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process

      1. Reading "habits of mind"

      Ability to select appropriate texts and understand reading strategies needed for the task.

      Prompt:

      1) From the class packet of resources, identify sources you will use and highlight passages that show how each source relates to your task.

      2) Note sources in bibliographic format (if applicable).

      Product: Highlighted passages to be used in the paper and a bibliography

      Meets:

      • Selects appropriate texts for task (if applicable)
      • Creates usable passages and a bibliography (if applicable)

      Not yet:

      Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets"

      • Create a packet of sources from the student articles brought in, and share with all the students so they have materials to draw from.
      • Demonstrate reading strategies relevant to a type of text to prepare students for next steps in the ladder.
      • Provide students with template for bibliography and explain format and use.

      PD/preparation:

      • Take students to computer lab and allow them to search for additional sources they might use for their papers.

      2. Essential vocabulary

      Ability to apply strategies for developing an understanding of a text by locating words and phrases that identify key concepts and facts or information

      1 day

      3. Note-taking 1

      Ability to read purposefully and select relevant information; to summarize and/or paraphrase.

      Prompt:

      1) Read selected sources and highlight information or vocabulary that pertains to the science—chemical bonding/structures of matter.

      2) From your readings—write a sentence or two that explains how the chemical bonding and/or chemical structures affect the use of plastics and how chemical bonding is involved in your argument.

      Product: Highlighted passages and several sentences.

      Meets:

      • Accomplishes task by selecting relevant source material to support controlling idea (include L2 and L3 if applied to task).
      • Answers question about plagiarism correctly and provides appropriate strategies for avoiding it.
      • Writes in readable prose.

      Not yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets"

      • Review policy for plagiarism, and develop students' understanding of it.
      • Provide students with a note-taking method and template.
      • Discuss the term "relevant" and what it means to stay on task—two demands embedded in the rubric.
      • Teach strategies for identifying and selecting source material in the form of quotes, passages, data, and so forth as it relates to a controlling idea and task—give students strategies for avoiding "highlight sprawl."
      • L2: Discuss what is meant by "credible sources" and strategies for recognizing a credible source.
      • L3: Discuss and demonstrate how authors identify "gaps" or "unanswered questions" and why this is important to inquiry.
      • Identify gaps or unanswered questions as you read about your topic.
      • Teach strategies for summarizing or paraphrasing.

      4. Note-taking 2

      Ability to prioritize and narrow supporting information.

  • Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing
    • Click here to download a pdf version of Skills Cluster 3.

      Pacing Skill and Definition Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...) Instructional Strategies

      Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing

      10 - 20 minutes

      1. Bridging conversation

      Ability to establish knowledge base and assess skills and strategies necessary to manage task.

      Prompt: In a quick write, explain what you know now that you've read about the use of plastics in food and drink containers. What additional information do you need to solidify your opinion? How will you go about getting that information?

      Product: Short response (with bullets) class work

      No scoring

      • Review professional or other samples of writing type and structure.
      • Deconstruct professional samples of the type of writing students will use. Provide sample conclusions (journal style and previous student work) to help students understand the expectations of the style of writing that is expected.
        • Note the difference between an "explanation" and an "argument."
        • Analyze purpose and audience.
        • Analyze tone and language choices.
        • Evaluate effectiveness. Do you get the information and explanation you expect? Why?
      • Discuss the prompt and what students need to do to complete the writing portion.
      • Refer to rubric—point out demands and qualities of performance, such as "substantive and credible, clear, thorough, relevant," etc.
  • Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process
    • Click here to download a pdf version of Skills Cluster 4.

      Pacing Skill and Definition Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...) Instructional Strategies

      Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process

      1. Initiation of task

      Ability to establish a controlling idea and consolidate information relevant to task.

      45 minutes

      2. Planning

      Ability to develop a line of thought and text structure appropriate to an argumentation task.

      Prompt: Create an outline including key elements drawn from your reading, and order them in a logical way so as to effectively answer the task prompt.

      Product: Outline/plan

      Meets:

      • Applies an outline strategy to develop reasoning for argument.
      • Provides citations and references with elements for correct form.
      • Draws a credible implication from information about an issue or topic.
      • Writes in readable prose.

      Not yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets"

      • Mini-lesson in logic structures.
      • Use discussion-based strategies to develop thinking relevant to prompt.
      • Have students connect ideas among the arts, literature, and events.

      1 day

      3. Development

      Ability to construct an initial draft with an emerging line of thought and structure.

      L2: Ability to analyze competing arguments.

      L3: Ability to make clarifying connections and/or provide examples.

      Prompt:

      Draft an opening for your composition with one or more sentences that establishes the controlling idea and provides a lead-in for your reader.

      Write an initial draft for your lab conclusion to include several paragraphs: an opening, development of your process, and an ending that includes a comment, conclusion, or implication.

      Product: Opening paragraph and first draft

      Meets:

      • Provides an opening to include a controlling idea and an opening strategy relevant to the prompt.
      • Provides an initial draft with all elements of the prompt addressed.
      • Writes in readable prose.

      Not yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets"

      • Explain how to open and end an argumentation composition.
      • Use template for all levels to guide students through first draft.
      • Facilitate student-led revision sessions.

      4. Revision

      Ability to apply revision strategies to refine development of an argument, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as appropriate to audience and purpose.

      Prompt: Apply revision strategies for clarity, logic, language, and cohesion. Use peers as well as the instructor.

      Product: Revised draft (2 or more)

      Meets:

      • Demonstrates use of revision strategies that clarify logic and development of ideas, embed relevant details, improve word-usage and phrasing, and create smooth transitions between sentences and paragraphs.
      • Applies a text structure to organize reading material content and to explain key points related to the prompt.

      Not yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets"

      • Develop ways to manage revision process so that students get feedback in timely and helpful ways.
      • Draft study (students volunteer a segment for class or small group help and discussion).
      • Peers provide feedback on clarity of thinking and development of claim/argument.
      • Read-aloud for peer and adult feedback.
      • Develop strategies for embedding information—citation methods, quoting, or paraphrasing.

      1 day

      5. Editing

      Ability to apply editing strategies and presentation applications.

      Prompt: Finalize draft for the readership; apply finishing touches (e.g. visuals, neatness, formatting, copyediting).

      Product: Next to final draft

      Meets: Demonstrates use of strategies that enhance the readability and appearance of the work for presentation.

      Not yet: Attempts to meet the criteria for "meets"

      • Use error analysis to encourage self-correction of language usage and grammatical errors.
      • Use copyediting marks.

      Final Draft

      Submit your final draft before or on due date for scoring and feedback.

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