Discipline: Science

Grade Level: 8

Course: Physical Science

©Literacy Design Collaborative. September 2011

Please log in to download related resources.
The Laws of Conservation and Photosynthesis
What
Instruction?
  • Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task

      15 minutes

      1. Task Engagement:

      Ability to connect the task and new content to existing knowledge, skills, experiences, interests, and concerns.

      Short Constructed Response:

      In a short response, define the law of conservation of matter and the law of conservation of energy. Give two examples of each.

      Students are able to correctly define the laws of conservation of matter and energy and are able to give accurate examples of both.

      • Link this task to earlier class content by using examples previously discussed. Examples for the law of conservation of matter include when water evaporates, it changes state but the matter is conserved, and when acids and bases react, the atoms are rearranged to form new molecules but matter is neither created nor destroyed. Examples for the law of conservation of energy include chemical energy being converted to light energy without energy being created or destroyed and gravitational energy being changed to mechanical energy without energy being created or destroyed.
      • Discuss student responses.
  • Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process

      25 minutes

      1. Active Reading:

      Ability to identify the central point and main supporting elements of a text.

      Short Constructed Response:

      Read the first selected text, identify the main points, and write a summary.

      Student writes an accurate summary that identifies the main points of the text.

      • Read the selected text together with the students.
      • Guide the students through a reading of the first text by asking leading questions to highlight the main points.
      • List and discuss the main points with the students.
      • Direct the students to write a summary using the points identified by the class.
      • Discuss the student summaries to identify strengths and weaknesses.

      25 minutes

      (same as above)

      Short Constructed Response:

      Read the second selected text, identify the main points, and write a summary.

      Student writes an accurate summary that identifies the main points of the text.

      • Students will complete the reading with a partner, identifying the main points, and then will write a summary with minimal teacher assistance.
      • Students will receive assistance only if requested.

      25 minutes

      (same as above)

      Short Constructed Response:

      Read the third selected text, identify the main points, and write a summary.

      Student writes an accurate summary that identifies the main points of the text.

      • Students will complete the reading with a partner, identifying the main points, and then will write a summary with minimal teacher assistance.
      • Students will receive assistance only if requested.

      Ongoing

      2. Academic Integrity:

      Ability to use and credit sources appropriately.

      Short Constructed Response:

      Students will create a citation for each article.

      Students accurately cite article.

      • As students read each article, the assistance they receive for writing the citation should decrease.
      • After they read the first article, stress the importance of including citation information with their notes or summary so that they have it later when they want to use the information from a source in their paper.
      • Give students a citation guide to assist them with writing a citation and guide them through writing the first citation.
      • Students should work with their partners to write the second citation after they read the second article.
      • Students should write the final citation independently after reading the third article.
      • Each citation should be included with the notes and summaries students write.

      15 minutes

      (same as above)

      Short Constructed Response:

      Write a sentence from each article and include an in-text citation.

      Students are able to accurately create in-text citations for each article.

      • Teacher will model writing one in-text citation.

      None

      3. Note Taking:

      Ability to read purposefully and select relevant information; to summarize and/or paraphrase.

      Outline:

      Use the graphic organizer to address key concepts that need to be included in an essay that completely addresses the task.

      Students identify relevant elements and include information to support accurate citation (for example, page numbers for a long text, clear indication when quoting directly, etc.).

      • Teach a model format for note taking; use a template to facilitate (teachers may create their own format or template).
      • Check that early student work is in the assigned format (or in another format that gathers the needed information effectively).
  • Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 3: Transition to Writing

      20 minutes

      1. Bridging:

      Ability to begin linking reading results to writing task.

      List:

      Brainstorm: Write down all you know from what you have read.

      Students are able to state the laws of conservation and photosynthesis and provide examples of each.

      • Class discussion will take place after the quick-write.

      15 minutes

      (same as above)

      Short Constructed Response:

      Re-examine the teaching task and determine what the controlling idea should be in this report.

      Students are able to determine the controlling ideas that are implicit in the teaching task.

      • Students will write the controlling idea and refer to it often in order to stay on topic.
  • Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 4: Writing Process

      25 minutes

      1. Planning:

      Ability to develop a line of thought and text structure appropriate to an information/explanation task.

      Outline:

      Create a graphic organizer that shows the connections between photosynthesis and the laws of conservation of matter.

      Students are able to place the relevant ideas on the graphic organizer that demonstrate an understanding of photosynthesis as an example of both the law of conservation of matter and the law of conservation of energy.

      • Create an organizer for students. Discuss with students where they have placed ideas and the reasoning behind the placement.

      30 minutes

      2. Development:

      Ability to construct an initial draft with an emerging line of thought and structure.

      Long Constructed Response:

      Write an initial draft of the body of the report with citations.

      Student provides complete draft of body paragraphs and supports the claim in the later sections with evidence and citations.

      • Encourage students to re-read prompt partway through writing to verify that they are on track.

      30 minutes

      3. Editing

      Ability to proofread and format a piece to make it more effective.

      Long Constructed Response:

      Revise draft for sound spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and grammar. Adjust formatting as needed to provide clear, appealing text.

      Provides a draft that is free from distracting surface errors. Uses format that supports purpose.

      • Briefly review selected skills that many students need to improve.
      • Teach a short list of proofreading marks.
      • Assign students to proofread each other’s texts a second time.

      20 minutes

      4. Revision:

      Ability to refine text, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as appropriate to audience and purpose.

      Long Constructed Response:

      Refine composition’s analysis, logic, and organization of ideas or points. Use textual evidence carefully, including accurate citations. Decide what to include and what to exclude.

      Student provides a complete response to the teaching task. States the claim and then provides evidence and citations in the body paragraphs. Improves earlier edition.

      • Sample useful feedback that balances support for strengths and clarity about weaknesses.
      • Assign students partners to provide each other with feedback on strengths and weaknesses.

      35 minutes

      5. Completion:

      Ability to submit final piece that meets expectations.

      Short Constructed Response:

      Write introduction and conclusion to the report; move the claim to the end of the introduction.

      Student is able to write a well-organized and coherent introduction and conclusion.

      • Stress to students the need to introduce the topic to the reader as well as summarize what was stated.

      None

      (same as above)

      Long Constructed Response:

      Turn in your complete set of drafts, plus the final version of your piece.

      Fits the “Meets Expectations” category in the rubric for the teaching task.

Please log in to write a Journal Entry.
Please log in to write a Journal Entry.

EduCore Log-in