Discipline: Humanities

Grade Level: 9-10 

Course: English/ History

©Literacy Design Collaborative. September 2011

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Government of the People
What
Instruction?
  • Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for Seminar and Task
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 1: Preparing for the Task

      Day 1

      1. Bridging Conversation

      Ability to see connections between ideas and concepts.

      Discussion Focus

      What is a “government of the people”?

      No scoring

      • Introduce the main ideas: Democracy, Government, Language, Leadership
      • Discuss the essential question:  What is a “government of the people”?  
      • S-L 9-10.1
  • Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process for Paideia Seminar
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 2: Reading Process for Paideia Seminar

      Days 1-2

      1. Inspectional Reading

      Ability to identify structural components of the seminar text. 

      Labeling text

      Label parts of the text by lettering the paragraphs and numbering the sentences.

      Structural features of the text are visible and clear.

      • Distribute copies of Pericles’ “Funeral Oration” excerpt and briefly discuss the words “funeral” and “oration.”
      • Guide students in labeling their copy of the text: lettering (A-C) each paragraph.  Also have students number the sentences, beginning with “1” in each paragraph (A=1-6; B=1-7; C=1-5).
      • Present key background points on Pericles (see student reader). 
      • RI.9-10.1& 2
      • (See Adler & Van Doren, pp. 31-44.)

      On-going

      2. Essential Vocabulary

      Ability to identify and master terms essential to understanding a text.

      Vocabulary List

      In your notebook, list words and phrases essential to the texts.  Add definitions, and (if appropriate) notes on connotation in this context.

      Lists appropriate phrases.

      Provides accurate definitions.

      • Ask some students to share definitions of terms.
      • Provide direct instruction as necessary and guide a close reading to work through key phrases.

      Days 2-4

      3. Analytical Reading & Note Taking

      Ability to read purposefully and compare information for relevance; to summarize, paraphrase, and evaluate.  

      Short Response

      Mini-task: Generate descriptive notes within a graphic organizer.

      Organizer is completely filled in with appropriate examples.

      • Ask students to read this speech independently.  Allow class time for reading the Pericles speech and taking notes on the Graphic Organizer (see student reader). 
      • Invite students to share selected responses from their notes on “Funeral Oration.” 
      • Briefly discuss the relationship between language and leadership. 
      • Distribute copies of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. Have students letter the paragraphs (A-C) and number the sentences in this speech (A=1; B=1-4; C=1-5).
      • Assign groups of three and have students read text aloud. One student begins by reading a paragraph and then the next student reads. Rotate so that all students have read each paragraph.  All students should hear the speech three to four times to imagine how tone and cadence convey different understandings or reactions.
      • Share essential background points about The Gettysburg Address.
      • RI.9-10.3, 4,  5
  • Skills Cluster 3: Dialogue Process (Paideia Seminar)
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 3: Dialogue Process (Paideia Seminar)

      Day 5

      1. Pre-seminar Process

      Ability to reflect on personal communication habits and select appropriate speaking and listening goals.

      Self-assessment

      Based on the list of Speaking and Listening behaviors, write a goal for your personal participation in the upcoming dialogue. See Appendix.

      Chooses appropriate individual process goal based on past seminar performance.

      • Teachers should take each of the Process steps of Paideia seminar including: definition and purpose for having the dialogue, role and responsibility of facilitator and participants, steps to guide personal and group process goals. (See Teaching Thinking Through Dialogue for examples of pre- and post-seminar process “scripts” embedded in sample seminar plans.)
      • Be sure to have students complete Paideia Seminar Speaking and Listening Skills Self-Assessment
      • Teacher should identify appropriate speaking and listening goals for the group. The group participation goal is discussed and posted where all can see.  
      • SL 9 – 10 
      • See Speaking and Listening Rubric and sample “Seminar Process Assessment” in Appendix.

      Day 5

      2. Seminar

      Ability to think critically and collaboratively in a group about concepts and ideas of a text through a structured Paideia seminar or other discussion-based strategy.

      Participate in the seminar and focus on your goals. 


      No scoring

      • Teacher should use the Gettysburg Address Seminar Plan in Appendix for scope and sequence of prepared Seminar Questions. 
      • RI 9 – 10.1; RI 9 – 10.6 & 8; SL 9 – 10 

      Day 5

      3. Post-seminar Process

      Ability to self-assess on speaking and listening skills practiced in the seminar and note relevant communication goals for future discussions.

      Self-assessment

      Reflect back on your participation goal, then finish filling out the Seminar Process Assessment form; write a short, detailed reflective work on your seminar performance. See Appendix.

      Answers task by filling in form completely.

      Writes in detail about seminar participation.

      • Have students complete their Paideia Seminar Speaking and Listening Skills Self-Assessment.
      • Invite a few students to share their goal for speaking and listening and their performance.
      • Lead the entire group to reflect on the entire dialogue process, i.e., the group effort.  (In whatever format is preferred, both individual and group reflections should be archived for reference at the beginning of the next seminar.) 
      • See Teaching Thinking Through Dialogue, pp. 44-48.
  • Skills Cluster 4: Transition to Writing
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 4: Transition to Writing

      Day 6

      1. Bridging Conversation & Note Taking

      Ability to connect seminar discussion to writing task.


      2. Task analysis

      Ability to understand and explain the task’s prompt and rubric.  

      Reflective Notes

      Based on our seminar discussion, write a short rough draft response to this writing prompt.


      Bullets

      In your own words, what are the important features of a good response to this prompt?

      No scoring

      • Display module task prominently in the classroom.  
      • Ask students to respond to the prompt by writing down as many ideas as they can recall either saying or hearing in the seminar discussion.  Note that they are adding to their Graphic Organizer from pre-seminar. (Remind students to keep all of these notes for reference throughout the writing process.)
      • Discuss what is being asked of the writer and potential audiences for the essay.
      • Share examples of types of compositions students will produce (either from past students or from professional writers).
      • Ask students to identify key features of examples making a bullet list.
      • Pair students to compare, revise, and clarify their individual bullets.  Display: TEACHING TASK RUBRIC (ARGUMENTATION)
      • W 9-10.5 
  • Skills Cluster 5: Writing Process
    • Pacing Skill and Definition Mini-Task Instructional Strategies
      Product and Prompt Scoring (Product "Meets Expectations" if it...)

      Skills Cluster 5: Writing Process

      Days 6-7

      1. Note Taking 

      Ability to select important facts and passages for use in one’s own writing.

      Notes

      Look back at your notes on “Funeral Oration” and the Gettysburg Address.  Find at least one passage in each text that either illustrates or supports each of your main ideas. Add those references to your notes.

      Identifies relevant elements in the text to support argument.
      Completed assignments contain at least one specific, appropriate textual reference for each main idea recorded.

      • Have students expand their notes by identifying at least one passage from each text that illustrates or proves each of the main points they listed in the previous writing prompt. .  Have them add these references to their notes in anticipation of using this textual support in their essays.

      Days 6-7

      2. Initiating the Task (Claim)

      Ability to establish a claim and consolidate information relevant to task.

      Opening Paragraph

      Write an opening paragraph that includes a claim and sequences the key points you plan to make in your composition. Writes a concise summary statement or draft opening.

      Provides direct answer to main prompt requirements.

      Establishes a claim.Identifies key points that support development of argument.

      • Display some examples of opening paragraphs.
      • Ask class to discuss what makes the examples strong or weak.
      • Review the list that students created earlier to identify needed elements.
      • Have students reread the two speeches and take notes on or highlight the key points that help answer the essay question. 
      • W.9-10.1, 4 & 9.

      Day 8

      3. Planning

      Ability to develop a line of thought and text structure appropriate to an argumentation task.

      Outline/Organizer

      Create an outline based on your notes and reading in which you state your claim, sequence your points, and note your supporting evidence. 

      Creates an outline or organizer.

      Supports controlling idea.

      Uses evidence from texts read earlier.

      • Provide and teach one or more examples of outlines or organizers.
      • Have students work in pairs to generate questions about how the format works, and then take and answer questions.
      • W.9-10.1, 4 & 9.

      Days 8-9

      4. Initial Draft & Development

      Ability to construct an initial draft with an emerging line of thought and structure.

      Initial Draft

      Write an initial draft complete with opening, development, and closing; insert and cite textual evidence. (L2) Explain relevant and plausible implications. (L2) Address the credibility and origin of sources in view of your research topic. (L3) Identify gaps or unanswered questions.

      Provides complete draft with all parts.

      Supports the opening in the later sections with evidence and citations. Encourage students to re-read prompt partway through writing to check that they are on-track. 

      • Encourage students to re-read prompt partway through writing to check that they are on-track. 
      • Have students work in pairs to review each other’s work, with particular emphasis on providing evidence for their claim. 
      • Have students work in pairs to review each other’s work, with particular emphasis on providing evidence for their claim. 
      • Have students continue with their writing and help them think about the rhetorical strategies used to differentiate actions from words, place from idea. 
      • W.9-10.1, 4 & 9.

      Days 10-11

      5. Revision

      Ability to refine text, including line of thought, language usage, and tone as appropriate to audience and purpose.

      Multiple Drafts

      Refine composition’s analysis, logic, and organization of ideas/points. Use textual evidence carefully, with accurate citations. Decide what to include and what not to include.

      Provides complete draft with all parts.

      Supports the opening in the later sections with evidence and citations.

      Improves earlier edition.

      • Sample useful feedback that balances support for strengths and clarity about weaknesses.
      • Assign students to provide each other with feedback on evidence and citations. 
      • Revisit: TEACHING TASK RUBRIC (ARGUMENTATION)
      • W.9-10.1, 4 & 9.

      Day 12

      6. Editing

      Ability to proofread and format a piece to make it more effective.

      Correct Draft

      Revise draft to have sound spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and grammar.  Adjust formatting as needed to provide clear, appealing text.

      Provides draft free from distracting surface errors.

      Uses format that supports purpose.

      • Briefly review selected skills that many students need to improve.
      • Teach a short list of proofreading marks.
      • Assign students to proofread each other’s texts a second time. 
      • W.9-10.1, 4 & 9.

      Days 13- 14

      7. Completion

      Ability to submit final draft that successfully addresses the task.

      Final Work

      Turn in your complete set of drafts, plus the final version of your piece.

      Demonstrates that composition is on task and ready for evaluation.

      • Encourage  re-reading to make last changes for clarity and coherence. 
      • W.9-10.1, 4 & 9.
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