Analysis: To separate an intellectual whole in order to investigate and evaluate its parts; the results of such thinking.

Resources for this term:
The Individual and the Community: My Responsibilities in a Time of Crisis
The Individual and the Community: My Responsibilities in a Time of Crisis

This is a middle school social studies module that addresses the relationship between the individual and society (one and many): specifically, what are the individual’s responsibilities with regard to the “social good”? This module is built around the Paideia method and the Socratic seminar.

Using Classification to Investigate Living Organisms
Using Classification to Investigate Living Organisms

Students will be able to investigate the diversity of living organisms and how they can be compared scientifically. They will recognize the organisms' characteristics and classify them into specific domains and kingdoms based upon the physical characteristics they observe.

The Power of Language (Communication is More than Language)
The Power of Language (Communication is More than Language)

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* This language arts module addresses the effects of language structures in nonfiction and poetry. This module involves critical analysis of genre structure, grammar, and literary devices. NOTE: This module is designed to teach and assess the Common Core State Standards College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening, including a formal and rigorous dialogue about concepts and ideas, as well as Common Core Reading and Writing standards.

Comparing Economic Systems
Comparing Economic Systems

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* Every society operates with a mixed economic system, combining the influences of market and command models in order to form a functioning economy and government. Individual countries have unique combinations of the market and command influences depending on how countries prioritize different economic goals. Students will learn the characteristics of the market and command systems and evaluate the benefits and consequences of each system.

Stranger in the Village: Informational
Stranger in the Village: Informational

This 12th grade English Language Arts module uses Template Task 21, along with text, film, and photography resources, to address the theme "stranger in the village." Texts aligned with this theme include characters or subjects that are isolated or different from others in their respective societies. Students will analyze how writers and artists organize or construct text to convey meaning and to relay this specific message.

Letter to Congress
Letter to Congress

In this English and U.S. history module, 11th grade students research fundamental elements of the Constitution, landmark Supreme Court cases, and a modern congressional issue. Using Template Task 1, students participate in the democratic process by writing letters to a member of Congress arguing their positions on a constitutional issue of their choosing.

Glasses
Glasses

Students solve problems in which they calculate the volume of liquid that would fill the bowls of glasses.

Plastics…to Use or Not to Use?
Plastics…to Use or Not to Use?

Students will construct an argumentation piece that defends their position on the widely debated topic of the use of plastic water bottles and storage containers for drinks and foods. The unit of study, within which this module happens to fall, is chemical bonding. Students have been discussing three types of chemical bonding: ionic, covalent, and metallic, and how this type of bonding affects the structure of matter. Students will construct a piece defending their position, as well as using their knowledge of chemical bonding and compounds to explain either the benefits or the harmful effects of using plastics to contain our everyday foods and drinks.

The Cold War
The Cold War

Students will read primary sources to help gain understanding of the Cold War from 1945 to 1975. Major themes explored in the unit include political decisions and actions of the U.S. and foreign governments, military strategies, and reactions of American Society. Students will use the knowledge of the time period and evidence from primary source documents to write a rough draft of an argumentation essay in response to the teaching task. Students will complete the teaching task in preparation for a final classroom assessment task. Students will learn most of the content first and complete the literacy module at the end of the unit.

A Cinderella Comparison
A Cinderella Comparison

Students will compare various cultures and gain an understanding of what is important in different cultures, through analyzing various versions of the fairy tale Cinderella.

Ancient India and China
Ancient India and China

Ancient India and China both developed along river valleys and became flourishing civilizations. This module will explore the geography, culture/customs, and the government of these two civilizations. Students will then draw conclusions or make implications in regard to the development and longevity of one of the cultures and how it developed with its own unique government and culture/customs. Students will be assigned one culture for research, and through shared presentations, students will be exposed to both cultures.

A Reading of the Gettysburg Address
A Reading of the Gettysburg Address

In this argumentation module, 9th and 10th grade students perform a close reading of the Gettysburg Address, participate in a Paideia Seminar on the text, and write an essay in which they evaluate Lincoln’s definition of democracy based on the speech using Template Task 6. This unit merges American history content with Common Core literacy skills.

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