Evidence: Facts, information, or something that provides proof to support whether a belief is true or valid.

Resources for this term:
The British Industrial Revolution
The British Industrial Revolution

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* By addressing Template Task 2, 10th grade social studies students answer the question: Were the achievements and growth experienced during the Industrial Revolution era worth the cost to society? This module sits inside a global history unit in which students study the Age of Revolution, focusing on the British Industrial Revolution.

Courage in Part One: To Kill A Mockingbird
Courage in Part One: To Kill A Mockingbird

Targeted for 9th and 10th graders, this literacy informational module uses Template Task 12 to focus on the definition of “courage” in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Many characters in the story display courage and as the novel progresses, these acts of courage increase in significance and scope. As they read, students generate a definition of “courage” as seen through the eyes of Harper Lee. Students also draw conclusions about Harper Lee's views on courage based upon the novel’s characters and events.

You Can Run, but You Can
You Can Run, but You Can't Hide!

Ninth grade advanced reading students are asked to explore the influence that digital technology has on their everyday lives. Using Template Task 8, students write an editorial that identifies a problem caused by others using the digital footprints we either purposely or inadvertently create. Students examine the intersection of social media and virtual and real life vulnerability. Students will take a close look at the implications of identity theft, unsolicited background checks, social media, and other ways we potentially expose ourselves through the use of technology.

Ideologies of the 19th Century
Ideologies of the 19th Century

As 9th grade students engage in this history module, they apply what they previously learned in a unit on political ideologies in Europe in the 19th century to answer Template Task 2. The module reinforces students’ ability to develop a historical essay through the research and writing processes.

Good Readers and Good Writers
Good Readers and Good Writers

Targeted for 10th grade English Language Arts students, this unit uses texts at different levels of difficulty to reach readers of varying ability levels. Students examine four texts to determine what qualities one must have to be considered a "good reader" and a "good writer." This module uses Template Task 2."

Existentialism and Kafka
Existentialism and Kafka

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* In this English literacy module, sophomore students conduct research on the existentialist movement in literature. Students read Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis and determine if Kafka’s work reflects existential ideas. After researching essays and articles on existentialism, students write an essay answering Template Task 11 that defines existentialism and explains its impact on Kafka’s work.

Recognizing Human Rights Violations in Countries in Crisis
Recognizing Human Rights Violations in Countries in Crisis

Students learn to recognize and analyze human rights violations in historical or current texts by using primary and secondary sources. Using Template Task 20, 10th grade English Language Arts students apply the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to analyze human rights violations in a specific country.

The Great War: Evaluating the Treaty of Versailles
The Great War: Evaluating the Treaty of Versailles

Students study a variety of primary sources, maps, and supporting documents concerning the post-war peace process, developing a context for evaluating whether the treaty was viable and fair. Students also consider complex questions surrounding historical causality and responsibility. This argumentation module is written around Template Task 2 for a high school social studies class.

Great Expectations: Growing into a Hero: Informational Module
Great Expectations: Growing into a Hero: Informational Module

The monomyth, or the hero's journey, is a narrative theme examined in detail in The Hero with a Thousand Faces (2008) by Joseph Campbell. Based on the concept of archetypes, the hero's journey can be identified in quest stories, both emotional and physical, from a variety of time periods and cultures. After conducting research on the hero's journey, advanced 7th grade English Language Arts students will write an informational essay framed by Template Task 11 that defines the word "archetype" and explains how the hero's journey is evident in Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.

U.S. Policy of Isolationism vs. Aggression in the 1930s
U.S. Policy of Isolationism vs. Aggression in the 1930s

In this high school social studies argumentation module, students answer Template Task 7. This module fits within a larger unit covering U.S. foreign policy during the 1930s, in which students develop an understanding of the actions of world leaders of the period. After conducting research, students write an essay that identifies a problem with U.S. policy during this time period and argues for a solution.

Julius Caesar: Hero or tyrant?
Julius Caesar: Hero or tyrant?

The Roman Empire was the largest and most enduring empire in the ancient world. The Romans had highly organized political, social, religious, technological, and economic systems that enabled them to control the territories and people within their borders. This 7th grade world history unit is embedded in the study of empires and the management systems they used. Students use both primary and secondary resources in their research on Julius Caesar. Using Template Task 2, students will investigate Caesar as an emblem of the Roman Empire's strengths and weaknesses and argue whether he should be considered a hero or a tyrant.

Why Canadians Live Where They Live: The Impact of Geography on Population Density in Canada.
Why Canadians Live Where They Live: The Impact of Geography on Population Density in Canada.

Sixth grade social studies students learning about world cultures and geography explore the impact of geographic characteristics on the population density of a post-industrialized nation (Canada). Students are asked to determine which factor — climate, location, or the distribution of natural resources — has the biggest impact on population density by addressing Template Task 6.

Nuclear Sustainability
Nuclear Sustainability

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* In this Project Based Learning (PBL) unit, 11th grade chemistry students are asked to answer the question, “Is nuclear energy sustainable?” by responding to Template Task 2. First, students are introduced to their task through an entry event in which they are given a brief introduction to the nuclear energy controversy and are told they will be writing an op-ed piece arguing for or against nuclear power based on their knowledge of the atom, nuclear chemistry, and nuclear power. They are also tasked with creating a public service announcement to persuade others of their views. After identifying what they know and want to learn about nuclear chemistry and nuclear power, they research the topics, complete labs and activities about atomic structure, read a number of different opinion pieces, and hear a presentation from an activist. They work collaboratively in groups for much of the process. Then they write their op-ed individually and complete the public service announcement in groups. The project concludes with presentations of their editorials and public service announcements to the class and community activists.

Stranger in the Village: Informational
Stranger in the Village: Informational

This 12th grade English Language Arts module uses Template Task 21, along with text, film, and photography resources, to address the theme "stranger in the village." Texts aligned with this theme include characters or subjects that are isolated or different from others in their respective societies. Students will analyze how writers and artists organize or construct text to convey meaning and to relay this specific message.

Language Is Power
Language Is Power

This argumentation module for a high school English class is designed to follow a class reading of Animal Farm and asks students to examine the propaganda and fallacies present in the novel’s events and dialogue. Students analyze the novel using Template Task 2.

U.S. Intervention in Foreign Wars
U.S. Intervention in Foreign Wars

As the United States expanded and developed into a global power in the early 1900s, its leaders became concerned with the affairs of other nations. As result, the U.S. took on a wider range of responsibilities in the world and became involved in foreign wars. This argumentation module asks 7th grade social studies students to answer Template Task 2 and write a letter to the President of the United States, arguing whether or not the U.S. should become involved in foreign wars.

Letter to Congress
Letter to Congress

In this English and U.S. history module, 11th grade students research fundamental elements of the Constitution, landmark Supreme Court cases, and a modern congressional issue. Using Template Task 1, students participate in the democratic process by writing letters to a member of Congress arguing their positions on a constitutional issue of their choosing.

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