Government: The system by which a community is ruled; the structure that informs, shapes, and sustains the distribution and exercise of authority in a political state.

Resources for this term:
Comparing Economic Systems
Comparing Economic Systems

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* Every society operates with a mixed economic system, combining the influences of market and command models in order to form a functioning economy and government. Individual countries have unique combinations of the market and command influences depending on how countries prioritize different economic goals. Students will learn the characteristics of the market and command systems and evaluate the benefits and consequences of each system.

Government of the People
Government of the People

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* This argumentation module asks 9th and 10th grade students in a humanities class to read two famous speeches regarding the rights and responsibilities of citizens in a democracy. Students are challenged to closely analyze these speeches in terms of language structure and democratic ideals by answering Template Task 4. The instructional sequence in this module includes independent and supported reading, conceptual dialogue, writing a comparative analysis essay, and Paideia Seminar discussion. Ultimately, students practice a series of interrelated literacy skills while gaining a deeper understanding of the historical rhetoric of two iconic leaders. The classroom assessment builds on the comparative analysis writing practice and challenges students to expand their thinking about rhetoric in contemporary American democracy.

Alexander the Great: Was He or Wasn’t He a Great Military Leader?
Alexander the Great: Was He or Wasn’t He a Great Military Leader?

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* Throughout history, military leaders have led conquests in an effort to increase their own or their country’s power. Some of the most exceptional of these leaders have been assigned the label “great” and continue to be featured in lessons on both history and military strategy. Students read a variety of informational and persuasive texts to analyze Alexander the Great’s success in battle and the influence that his success had on countless military commanders who followed, arguing the degree of greatness of this young Macedonian king by answering Template Task 2.

U.S. Policy of Isolationism vs. Aggression in the 1930s
U.S. Policy of Isolationism vs. Aggression in the 1930s

In this high school social studies argumentation module, students answer Template Task 7. This module fits within a larger unit covering U.S. foreign policy during the 1930s, in which students develop an understanding of the actions of world leaders of the period. After conducting research, students write an essay that identifies a problem with U.S. policy during this time period and argues for a solution.

The Great War: Evaluating the Treaty of Versailles
The Great War: Evaluating the Treaty of Versailles

Students study a variety of primary sources, maps, and supporting documents concerning the post-war peace process, developing a context for evaluating whether the treaty was viable and fair. Students also consider complex questions surrounding historical causality and responsibility. This argumentation module is written around Template Task 2 for a high school social studies class.

Letter to Congress
Letter to Congress

In this English and U.S. history module, 11th grade students research fundamental elements of the Constitution, landmark Supreme Court cases, and a modern congressional issue. Using Template Task 1, students participate in the democratic process by writing letters to a member of Congress arguing their positions on a constitutional issue of their choosing.

Ancient India and China
Ancient India and China

Ancient India and China both developed along river valleys and became flourishing civilizations. This module will explore the geography, culture/customs, and the government of these two civilizations. Students will then draw conclusions or make implications in regard to the development and longevity of one of the cultures and how it developed with its own unique government and culture/customs. Students will be assigned one culture for research, and through shared presentations, students will be exposed to both cultures.

A Reading of the Gettysburg Address
A Reading of the Gettysburg Address

In this argumentation module, 9th and 10th grade students perform a close reading of the Gettysburg Address, participate in a Paideia Seminar on the text, and write an essay in which they evaluate Lincoln’s definition of democracy based on the speech using Template Task 6. This unit merges American history content with Common Core literacy skills.

U.S. Intervention in Foreign Wars
U.S. Intervention in Foreign Wars

As the United States expanded and developed into a global power in the early 1900s, its leaders became concerned with the affairs of other nations. As result, the U.S. took on a wider range of responsibilities in the world and became involved in foreign wars. This argumentation module asks 7th grade social studies students to answer Template Task 2 and write a letter to the President of the United States, arguing whether or not the U.S. should become involved in foreign wars.

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