Plagiarism: To copy or imitate another’s work (ideas, language, thoughts, etc.) and present it as one’s own original work.

Resources for this term:
Existentialism and Kafka
Existentialism and Kafka

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* In this English literacy module, sophomore students conduct research on the existentialist movement in literature. Students read Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis and determine if Kafka’s work reflects existential ideas. After researching essays and articles on existentialism, students write an essay answering Template Task 11 that defines existentialism and explains its impact on Kafka’s work.

You Can Run, but You Can
You Can Run, but You Can't Hide!

Ninth grade advanced reading students are asked to explore the influence that digital technology has on their everyday lives. Using Template Task 8, students write an editorial that identifies a problem caused by others using the digital footprints we either purposely or inadvertently create. Students examine the intersection of social media and virtual and real life vulnerability. Students will take a close look at the implications of identity theft, unsolicited background checks, social media, and other ways we potentially expose ourselves through the use of technology.

The Cold War
The Cold War

Students will read primary sources to help gain understanding of the Cold War from 1945 to 1975. Major themes explored in the unit include political decisions and actions of the U.S. and foreign governments, military strategies, and reactions of American Society. Students will use the knowledge of the time period and evidence from primary source documents to write a rough draft of an argumentation essay in response to the teaching task. Students will complete the teaching task in preparation for a final classroom assessment task. Students will learn most of the content first and complete the literacy module at the end of the unit.

A Reading of the Gettysburg Address
A Reading of the Gettysburg Address

In this argumentation module, 9th and 10th grade students perform a close reading of the Gettysburg Address, participate in a Paideia Seminar on the text, and write an essay in which they evaluate Lincoln’s definition of democracy based on the speech using Template Task 6. This unit merges American history content with Common Core literacy skills.

Alexander the Great: Was He or Wasn’t He a Great Military Leader?
Alexander the Great: Was He or Wasn’t He a Great Military Leader?

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* Throughout history, military leaders have led conquests in an effort to increase their own or their country’s power. Some of the most exceptional of these leaders have been assigned the label “great” and continue to be featured in lessons on both history and military strategy. Students read a variety of informational and persuasive texts to analyze Alexander the Great’s success in battle and the influence that his success had on countless military commanders who followed, arguing the degree of greatness of this young Macedonian king by answering Template Task 2.

Cryobiology
Cryobiology

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* This module is nested within a larger unit on states and properties of matter in a physical science class. Eighth grade students expound upon these topics by examining the field of cryobiology, which is the study of living things at very low temperatures. Students will examine the pros and cons of the techniques used, as this science relies on a number of controversial and cutting edge technologies, and formulate an argument based on scientific facts using Template Task 2.

Energy Transfer
Energy Transfer

All parts of matter have kinetic energy. The kinetic energy of the particles can change speed, resulting in phase change. The three states of matter on Earth are solid, liquid, and gas. During this module, 8th grade science students read texts on states of matter, kinetic energy, and particles and write an informational essay using Template Task 11 that explains the motion of the particles through the states of matter.

Ancient India and China
Ancient India and China

Ancient India and China both developed along river valleys and became flourishing civilizations. This module will explore the geography, culture/customs, and the government of these two civilizations. Students will then draw conclusions or make implications in regard to the development and longevity of one of the cultures and how it developed with its own unique government and culture/customs. Students will be assigned one culture for research, and through shared presentations, students will be exposed to both cultures.

The Great War: Evaluating the Treaty of Versailles
The Great War: Evaluating the Treaty of Versailles

Students study a variety of primary sources, maps, and supporting documents concerning the post-war peace process, developing a context for evaluating whether the treaty was viable and fair. Students also consider complex questions surrounding historical causality and responsibility. This argumentation module is written around Template Task 2 for a high school social studies class.

Government of the People
Government of the People

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* This argumentation module asks 9th and 10th grade students in a humanities class to read two famous speeches regarding the rights and responsibilities of citizens in a democracy. Students are challenged to closely analyze these speeches in terms of language structure and democratic ideals by answering Template Task 4. The instructional sequence in this module includes independent and supported reading, conceptual dialogue, writing a comparative analysis essay, and Paideia Seminar discussion. Ultimately, students practice a series of interrelated literacy skills while gaining a deeper understanding of the historical rhetoric of two iconic leaders. The classroom assessment builds on the comparative analysis writing practice and challenges students to expand their thinking about rhetoric in contemporary American democracy.

The Individual and the Community: My Responsibilities in a Time of Crisis
The Individual and the Community: My Responsibilities in a Time of Crisis

This is a middle school social studies module that addresses the relationship between the individual and society (one and many): specifically, what are the individual’s responsibilities with regard to the “social good”? This module is built around the Paideia method and the Socratic seminar.

Career Exploration Wrap Up: Informational
Career Exploration Wrap Up: Informational

Career and technical education students in 6th, 7th, and 8th grades use an interactive online career assessment tool to narrow down potential career possibilities. Students write an informational essay that describes their desired career and the education needed to find a position in that field. Students answer Template Task 13 by supporting their response with evidence from their research.

Good Readers and Good Writers
Good Readers and Good Writers

Targeted for 10th grade English Language Arts students, this unit uses texts at different levels of difficulty to reach readers of varying ability levels. Students examine four texts to determine what qualities one must have to be considered a "good reader" and a "good writer." This module uses Template Task 2."

Nuclear Sustainability
Nuclear Sustainability

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* In this Project Based Learning (PBL) unit, 11th grade chemistry students are asked to answer the question, “Is nuclear energy sustainable?” by responding to Template Task 2. First, students are introduced to their task through an entry event in which they are given a brief introduction to the nuclear energy controversy and are told they will be writing an op-ed piece arguing for or against nuclear power based on their knowledge of the atom, nuclear chemistry, and nuclear power. They are also tasked with creating a public service announcement to persuade others of their views. After identifying what they know and want to learn about nuclear chemistry and nuclear power, they research the topics, complete labs and activities about atomic structure, read a number of different opinion pieces, and hear a presentation from an activist. They work collaboratively in groups for much of the process. Then they write their op-ed individually and complete the public service announcement in groups. The project concludes with presentations of their editorials and public service announcements to the class and community activists.

Plastics…to Use or Not to Use?
Plastics…to Use or Not to Use?

Students will construct an argumentation piece that defends their position on the widely debated topic of the use of plastic water bottles and storage containers for drinks and foods. The unit of study, within which this module happens to fall, is chemical bonding. Students have been discussing three types of chemical bonding: ionic, covalent, and metallic, and how this type of bonding affects the structure of matter. Students will construct a piece defending their position, as well as using their knowledge of chemical bonding and compounds to explain either the benefits or the harmful effects of using plastics to contain our everyday foods and drinks.

U.S. Intervention in Foreign Wars
U.S. Intervention in Foreign Wars

As the United States expanded and developed into a global power in the early 1900s, its leaders became concerned with the affairs of other nations. As result, the U.S. took on a wider range of responsibilities in the world and became involved in foreign wars. This argumentation module asks 7th grade social studies students to answer Template Task 2 and write a letter to the President of the United States, arguing whether or not the U.S. should become involved in foreign wars.

U.S. Policy of Isolationism vs. Aggression in the 1930s
U.S. Policy of Isolationism vs. Aggression in the 1930s

In this high school social studies argumentation module, students answer Template Task 7. This module fits within a larger unit covering U.S. foreign policy during the 1930s, in which students develop an understanding of the actions of world leaders of the period. After conducting research, students write an essay that identifies a problem with U.S. policy during this time period and argues for a solution.

Julius Caesar: Hero or tyrant?
Julius Caesar: Hero or tyrant?

The Roman Empire was the largest and most enduring empire in the ancient world. The Romans had highly organized political, social, religious, technological, and economic systems that enabled them to control the territories and people within their borders. This 7th grade world history unit is embedded in the study of empires and the management systems they used. Students use both primary and secondary resources in their research on Julius Caesar. Using Template Task 2, students will investigate Caesar as an emblem of the Roman Empire's strengths and weaknesses and argue whether he should be considered a hero or a tyrant.

Romeo and Juliet: Decisions
Romeo and Juliet: Decisions

After reading Romeo and Juliet and researching articles on how the adolescent brain functions, 9th grade students examine the criteria for making a good decision using a business decision-making model. Students then examine the choices the characters Romeo and Juliet made and follow Template Task 2 to write an advice article for a teen publication that addresses the question: what is the process for making a good decision?

The Power of Language (Communication is More than Language)
The Power of Language (Communication is More than Language)

*EXEMPLAR MODULE* This language arts module addresses the effects of language structures in nonfiction and poetry. This module involves critical analysis of genre structure, grammar, and literary devices. NOTE: This module is designed to teach and assess the Common Core State Standards College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening, including a formal and rigorous dialogue about concepts and ideas, as well as Common Core Reading and Writing standards.

Using Classification to Investigate Living Organisms
Using Classification to Investigate Living Organisms

Students will be able to investigate the diversity of living organisms and how they can be compared scientifically. They will recognize the organisms' characteristics and classify them into specific domains and kingdoms based upon the physical characteristics they observe.

Biodiversity
Biodiversity

Earth is rich with an amazing variety of life. Is it important to preserve this biodiversity? This introductory writing assignment for a life science class focuses on introducing 7th grade students to the concept and importance of biodiversity. After reading articles on biodiversity, students write a report that defines “biodiversity” and explain its importance by following Template Task 11.

Great Expectations: Growing into a Hero: Informational Module
Great Expectations: Growing into a Hero: Informational Module

The monomyth, or the hero's journey, is a narrative theme examined in detail in The Hero with a Thousand Faces (2008) by Joseph Campbell. Based on the concept of archetypes, the hero's journey can be identified in quest stories, both emotional and physical, from a variety of time periods and cultures. After conducting research on the hero's journey, advanced 7th grade English Language Arts students will write an informational essay framed by Template Task 11 that defines the word "archetype" and explains how the hero's journey is evident in Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.

Extended Metaphors in Walt Whitman’s “O Captain! My Captain!”
Extended Metaphors in Walt Whitman’s “O Captain! My Captain!”

“O Captain! My Captain!” is one of Walt Whitman’s most famous poems. Whitman not only expresses his own grief over the loss of Abraham Lincoln, but also represents the somber feelings of many Americans during a time when they otherwise would have been celebrating the Union’s Civil War victory. Whitman uses a number of extended metaphors – most notably comparing Lincoln to the captain of a ship – to speak for the nation. Using Template Task 2, 8th grade students determine if Whitman was justified in his comparisons.

Language Is Power
Language Is Power

This argumentation module for a high school English class is designed to follow a class reading of Animal Farm and asks students to examine the propaganda and fallacies present in the novel’s events and dialogue. Students analyze the novel using Template Task 2.

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